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Canelo Alvarez Is Talented But…A BIG But…

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LAS VEGAS – The tub thumpers and the suits have been insisting for weeks now that tonight’s showdown between Floyd Mayweather, Jr. and Saul “Canelo’’ Alvarez is the biggest event in boxing in years. For accounting purposes it would appear they may be right, but based on what?

According to Richard Schaefer, CEO of Golden Boy Promotions, several thousand seats have been added inside the MGM Grand Garden Arena, thus pushing the record live gate to $20,003,151, and while the pay-per-view sales may not eclipse the record set by Mayweather and Oscar De La Hoya of 2,552,566 million buys seven years ago, tonight’s fight could well eclipse the all-time pay-per-view sales number of $137.5 million even if it doesn’t approach the actual sales of De La Hoya-Mayweather. As “Money’’ Mayweather has pointed out, “That’s what we’re counting and that’s the point.’’

With HD costing $74.95 and constituting about 60% of the total buys if the fight approaches the all-time record it could gross upwards of $180 million according to the fight’s promoters and even if it hovers more in the range of 1.5 million to 1.8 million buys it could still eclipse the gross sales number from Mayweather-De La Hoya. What this all shows you is the power of constant marketing by CBS, SHOWTIME and across internet platforms and all forms of social media.

If the public is told often enough that something is, as SHOWTIME Sports head Stephen Espinoza said on Wednesday, “the biggest fight in boxing history’’ people who have never heard of Ali-Frazier I or Leonard-Hearns or The Rumble in The June begin to believe it but from a fistic point of view what can possibly lead you to such a conclusion?

Mayweather is admittedly the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world, an undefeated champion who has won eight world titles in five different weight classes and defeated 16 world champions and at 36 has shown little signs of slippage.

So for this to actually be “the biggest fight in boxing history’’ if we are looking at it as an actual fight rather than a TV show we must consider young Alvarez. Certainly he is wildly popular in Mexico, both because of his style and success in the ring (42-0-1, 30 KO) and his unusual carrot top hair that led to his being called “Canelo’’ (Spanish for cinnamon). His good looks, relentless style and those red locks have combined to turn him into a phenomenon there, yet when one closely considers his record, what do we find? Frankly, nothing to justify a record live gate or new marks for pay-per-view sales.

This is not to dismiss him, because Alvarez is a talented young man with reasonable punching power and the ability to throw a body shot that can cave your ribs in. Yet when one looks at his list of recent opponents there is nothing to suggest he belongs in the same ring with Mayweather, at least not in so heavily hyped an event.

Since winning the WBC junior middleweight title two years ago, Alvarez has fought seven times going the distance against Matthew Hatton, an utterly shot Shane Mosley and a light hitting discounted version of Mayweather named Austin Trout.

He also stopped Ryan Rhodes (who?), reality TV boxer Alfonso Gomez, thread bare Kermit Cintron and a blown up 140 pounder named Josesito Lopez. That resume led Mayweather to remark during the week that if one does their homework they can come to but one conclusion about how this will all play out – which is to say badly for Canelo Alvarez.

“I fought Miguel Cotto,’’ Mayweather said. “He fought Miguel Cotto’s brother. I fought Ricky Hatton. He fought Ricky Hatton’s brother. He’s fighting Floyd Mayweather. He’s not fighting Floyd Mayweather’s brother. If he fought 42 Floyd Mayweathers he wouldn’t be 42-0. He’d be 0-42.’’

The stark logic of Mayweather’s assessment of Alvarez’s resume is undeniable. One can of course argue that until a young fighter beats a top level opponent question marks will always exist and there is little he can do about them until his moment comes as Alvarez’s will tonight. But is such an unproven fighter ready for the kind of challenge Mayweather provides?

Frankly, there is little reason to believe so.

Ricky Hatton was the last undefeated fighter to face Mayweather. He was 43-0 at the time with significant wins over Jose Luis Castillo, who had once given Mayweather the closest fight of his life, and future Hall of Famer Kostya Tszyu. Soon after the first bell sounded Hatton learned his “0’’ meant nothing once he was across the ring from Mayweather, who stopped him in the 10th round six years ago.

Alvarez says he has studied that fight closely and claims he has learned from Hatton’s mistakes. He had best hope so.

“I’ve seen what he did,’’ Alvarez said. “He kept coming in and pressuring Floyd and throwing a lot of punches but I felt he kept coming in a little too open. He was getting caught with many punches coming in, especially the right hand and, obviously, finally with the left hook that got him out of there. He made mistakes coming in wide open.’’

They are mistakes Canelo Alvarez says he will avoid but everyone says that until they find themselves in with Mayweather and being asked questions for which they have no answers.

By then, of course, the money will be in, the stands will be full and millions of people worldwide will have settled in to watch a fight they will not see because they never looked past the hype.

How different Alvarez may not yet know. Compared to Mayweather his resume is uninspiring. That he is skilled is clear and no one would argue who has the superior power but against Mayweather none of those attributes have made a difference in the past because he is indeed different. The question Saul Alvarez must answer tonight is:  how different?

 

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Emerging Heavyweights: Three to Watch

Ted Sares

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Victor Faust (Viktor Vykhryst), a 6’6” 232-pound Ukrainian heavyweight (and long-time amateur) is a product of the great amateur program in the Ukraine–one that has produced the likes of the Klitschko brothers, Oleksandr Usyk, Vasily Lomachenko, and more recently Sergiy Derevyanchenko.

At first glance, his amateur record does not appear stellar, but a closer review indicates several SD’s or MD’s.

Earlier this month, on Sept. 20, he scored a frightening one punch KO when he fought the more experienced Gabriel Enguema (10-9) in the Ukrainian city of Dnipro. It was his third KO victory in three professional fights—all in 2020. The end came as a result of a Doctor Steelhammer-like perfect straight right to knock the Spaniard out cold. It brought back memories of Wladimir’s KO of Calvin Brock in 2006. Faust displayed skills, size, a solid chin, and power in dispatching his opponent.

“…Soon everyone will …see how skillful he is. He’s the complete package and will compete in massive fights sooner rather than later.” Erol Ceylan (Faust’s German promoter)

Oh yes, Faust beat Romanian Mihai Nistor in the amateurs and the talented Nistor in turn halted Anthony Joshua in the amateurs back in 2011. (Nistor also went 1-2 with Filip Hrgovic and lost to Tony Yoka in 2012.) Of course, one must be circumspect when using logic in boxing. Now that Nistor has turned pro, he will be worth following as his style is very much Tysonesque.

There are others who have—at a minimum– the same potential as Faust.

Tony Yoka

tony

Hard-hitting Frenchman 6’7” Tony Yoka (8-0) has beaten far better opposition than Faust and has a far better amateur record. In fact, he beat Filip Hrgovic and Joe Joyce in the 2016 Rio Games on the way to a Gold Medal. Recently, he dismantled veteran and fellow Frenchman Johan Duhaupas, a fringe contender with some notable notches on his belt. The end came in the first round by virtue of a crunching right uppercut.

Yoka perhaps could be slotted above Faust at this point.; he just might be the best of the new guys on the block. However, there are some dicey anti-doping issues that have tainted his reputation, though they do seem to be mostly resolved at this point.

Arslanbek Makhmudov

Arslanbek

This Russian “Lion,” 6’5 ½”, 260 pounds with an imposing muscular frame, is still another hungry prospect ready to break into the next tier. Nicknamed the “Lion,” — he also has been called “Predator” and “Beast — he is 10-0 (10 KOs).

He now lives and fights out of Montreal. The holder of two regional titles, he stopped a shot Samuel Peter in one round this past December.

“I’m confident that with my team, Eye of the Tiger Promotions and Golden Boy Promotions, I will reach my goal of becoming heavyweight champion of the world,” —Makhmudov.

This all said, The Lion needs some work on his technical skills as size can only go so far.

Makhmudov’s next opponent is Canadian heavyweight Dillon “Big Country” Carman (14-5) whose claim to fame is that he KOd comebacking Donovan Ruddock in 2015 in Toronto. This one will end differently for “Big Country.”

Others

Arguably, classy Americans Stephan Shaw (13-0), and Jared Anderson (6-0 with four KOs in the first round) could be added to the above. Filip Hrgovic and Efe Ajagba, both 6’6”, have already moved up.

A good yardstick is 6’5” American Jonathan Rice who lost a 10-round bout to Ajagba, was TKO’d in the seventh round Makhmudov, lost a 6-round decision to Tony Yoka, and a lost 6-round decision to Shaw.

Have I missed any?

Ted Sares can be reached at tedsares@roadrunner.com of on Facebook.

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Jermell Charlo Unifies Super Welterweights Via Solar Plexus Punch

David A. Avila

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WBC super welterweight titlist Jermell Charlo knocked out IBF and WBA titlist Jeison Rosario with a knockout punch delivered to the solar plexus on Saturday to add two more belts to his collection.

“I’m definitely bringing home the straps,” said Charlo.

Shades of Bob Fitzsimmons.

Back in 1897, Fitzsimmons used the same solar plexus punch to dethrone Gentleman James Corbett for the heavyweight title in Carson City, Nevada.

In another casino city Charlo (34-1, 18 KOs) floored Dominican Republic’s Rosario (20-2-1, 14 KOs) three times at the Mohegan Sun Casino in Uncasville, Conn. He and his brother co-headlined a heavy duty pay-per-view card with no fans in attendance on the Premier Boxing Champions card.

Charlo jumped on Rosario quickly in the first round when he charged and clipped him with a left hook to the temple. Down went the two-belt champion for the count. But he got up seemingly unfazed.

For the next several rounds Rosario was the aggressor and put the pressure on Charlo who was content to allow the Dominican to fire away. Occasionally the Houston fighter jabbed but allowed Rosario to pound up and down with both fists.

After allowing Rosario to get comfortable with his attack, suddenly Charlo stopped moving and connected with a short crisp counter left hook and right cross in the sixth round. Down went Rosario again and he got up before the count of 10.

Charlo said it was part of the game plan.

“I’m growing and I realize that the knockout will just come,” he said.

Charlo was in control with a patient style and allowed Rosario to come forward. But the Dominican was more cautious in the seventh.

In the eighth round Charlo jabbed to the head and then jabbed hard to Rosario’s stomach. The Dominican fighter dropped down on his seat as if felled by a gun shot. He could not get up and convulsed while on the floor. The referee Harvey Dock counted him out at 21 seconds of round eight.

“That jab that got to him must have landed in a vital point,” said Charlo after the fight. “I hope he recovers and bounces back.”

Charlo now has three of the four major super welterweight world titles.

WBC Super Bantamweight Title

Luis Nery (31-0, 24 KOs) captured the WBC super bantamweight title by unanimous decision over fellow Mexican Aaron Alameda (25-1, 13 KOs) in a battle between southpaws. The war between border town fighters was intense.

Nery, a former bantamweight world titlist, moved up a weight division and found Alameda to be a slick southpaw with an outstanding jab. At first the Tijuana fighter was a little puzzled how to attack but found his groove in the fourth round.

But Alameda, who fights out of Nogales, Mexico, began using combinations and finding success.  A crafty counter left uppercut caught Nery charging in a few times, but he managed to walk through them.

In the final two rounds Nery picked up the action and increased the pressure against the slick fighting Alameda, He forced the Nogales fighter to fight defensively and that proved enough to give the last two rounds for Nery and the victory by unanimous decision. The scores were 115-113, 116-112 and 118-110 for Nery who now holds the WBC super bantamweight world title. He formerly held the WBC bantamweight title.

Roman Wins

Danny “Baby-Faced Assassin” Roman (28-3-1, 10 KOs) managed to rally from behind and defeat Juan Carlos Payano (21-4, 9 KOs) in a battle between former world champions in a nontitle super bantamweight clash. It wasn’t easy.

Once again Roman fought a talented southpaw and in this fight Payano, a former bantamweight titlist, moved up in weight and kept Roman off balance for the first half of the fight. The jab and movement by the Dominican fighter seemed to keep Roman out of sync.

Roman, who fights out of Los Angeles, used a constant body attack to wear down the 35-year-old Payano and it paid off in the second half. Then the former unified world champion Roman began to pinpoint more blows to the body and head. With seconds left in the 12th and final round, a left hook delivered Payano down and through the ropes. Sadly, the referee missed the knockdown. It didn’t matter as all three judges scored it identical at 116-112 for Roman after 12 rounds.

“I made some adjustments and picked up the pace and got the win,” said Roman who formerly held the WBA and IBF super bantamweight world titles.

Photo credit: Amanda Westcott / SHOWTIME

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Jermall Charlo UD 12 Derevyanchenko; Figueroa and Casimero Also Triumphant

Arne K. Lang

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Jermall Charlo UD 12 Derevyanchenko; Figueroa and Casimero Also Triumphant

The Mohegan Sun Casino in Uncasville, Connecticut, was the site of the first pay-per-view boxing event in the United States since the Fury-Wilder rematch on Feb. 22. There were six fights in all, five of which were title fights and the other a title-eliminator. They were divided into two tiers but bundled into a package that cost approximately a dollar a round with a facile intermission tossed in at no extra charge.

The headline attraction of the first “three-pack” – and the most anticipated fight of the evening – found WBC world middleweight champion Jermall Charlo defending his title against Sergiy Derevyanchenko. The Ukrainian gave Gennady Golovkin a hard tussle when they fought in November of last year at Madison Square Garden – GGG won a unanimous decision but the scores were tight and many thought Derevyanchenko deserved the decision – and the expectation was that tonight’s match would also be very competitive.  But it really wasn’t although the rugged Derevyanchenko rarely took a backward step.

The fight went the distance and there were no knockdowns, but Charlo buckled his knees at the end of round three and Derevyanchenko ended the fight with cuts above both eyes. The judges had it 118-110, 117-111, and 116-112.

With Canelo Alvarez apparently headed to 168 and GGG showing his age at 38, one can make a strong case that the undefeated 30-year-old Jermall Charlo (31-0, 22 KOs) is now the top middleweight in the world. Derevyanchenko, who was 23-1 in the semi-pro World Series of Boxing before turning pro, saw his pro record decline to 13-3 with all three losses in middleweight title fights.

The middle fight of the first tier was a lusty encounter between Mexican-American super bantamweights Brandon Figueroa and Damien Vazquez. Figueroa, one of two fighting brothers from the Mexican border town of Weslaco, Texas, was a huge favorite over Vazquez, a Colorado native who moved to Las Vegas as a freshman in high school and had fought extensively in Mexico where he made his pro debut at age 16. But Vazquez, the nephew of former three-time world super bantamweight title-holder Israel Vazquez, came to fight and gave a good effort until the fight turned lopsidedly against him.

In the middle rounds, Figueroa’s high-pressure attack began to wear Vazquez down. Vazquez had a few good moments in rounds six and eight, but when his right eye began swelling from the cut above it, he was fighting an uphill battle. He took a lot of punishment before referee Gary Rosato halted it at the 1:18 mark of round 10.

Figueroa, 23, successfully defended his WBA 122-pound title while improving his record to 21-0-1 with his 16th KO. Vazquez declined to 15-2-1.

The lid-lifter was a WBO bantamweight title defense by John Riel Casimero with Duke Micah in the opposite corner. Micah, from Accra, Ghana, came in undefeated at 24-0, but Casimero had faced a far stronger schedule and was a substantial favorite.

A Filipino who was been training in Las Vegas under Bones Adams, Casimero took Micah out in the third round. The Brooklyn-based Micah was somewhat busier in the opening frame, but the tide turned quickly in favor of the Filipino. Casimero hurt Micah with a left hook in round two and went for the kill. He wasn’t able to finish him, but Micah was on a short leash and referee Steve Willis was quick to step in when Casimero resumed his attack after the break. The official time was 0:54.

Casimero (30-4, 21 KOs) was defending the title he won last November with a third-round knockout of favored Zolani Tete in Birmingham, England. He was slated to fight this past April in Las Vegas against Naoya Inoue, but that fight evaporated as a result of the coronavirus. After the bout, Casimero called out Inoue (and others): “I’m the real monster,” he said. “Naoya Inoue is scared of me. You’re next. I would have knocked out anyone today. If Inoue doesn’t fight me, then I’ll fight Guillermo Rigondeaux, Luis Nery, or any of the top fighters.”

Check back shortly for David Avila’s summaries of the remaining fights.

Photo credit: Amanda Westcott / SHOWTIME

Check out more boxing news on video at the Boxing Channel 

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

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