Connect with us

Featured Articles

Abel Sanchez Candidly Shares His Feelings About GGG and Andy Ruiz

Arne K. Lang

Published

on

Abel Sanchez Candidly Shares His Feelings About GGG and Andy Ruiz

The noted trainer Abel Sanchez has taken his lumps lately, but he was as congenial as ever as he conversed with this reporter during a lull in the action on last Saturday’s show at the MGM Grand Garden. Earlier in the evening, one of Sanchez’s newest proteges, Guido Vianello, had advanced his record to 4-0 with a second round stoppage of sacrificial lamb Keenan Hickmon. A six-foot-six heavyweight from Italy, Vianello was “awarded a scholarship” to Sanchez’s boxing academy by Bob Arum after signing with Arum’s Top Rank organization in November of last year.

Our talk inevitably turned to his fractured relationship with Gennady Golovkin. When we visited “The Summit,” the name of Sanchez’s training facility in Big Bear, California, in March of 2016, the fighter from Kazakhstan and his Mexican-American coach appeared to have an unbreakable bond. When in training, GGG resided in the compound that Sanchez built as a combination dormitory and training facility, a 5,200 square foot complex with a gym in the lower level. Sanchez spoke highly of GGG back then, not just as a boxer but as a person. Despite his growing fame, said Sanchez, GGG was as unspoiled as the day they first met in March of 2010.

In his first fight under Sanchez’s tutelage, Golovkin went to Panama City and won the WBA middleweight title with a 58-second blowout of Milton Nunez. He would go on to unify the title while tying Bernard Hopkins’ record for successful middleweight title defenses (20).

In April, GGG severed the relationship. This came shortly after he signed a three-year, six-fight deal with DAZN worth a reported $100 million. He subsequently hooked up with Johnathon Banks, a protégé of Emanuel Steward. Banks was in GGG’s corner not quite two weeks ago when GGG bombed out overmatched Steve Rolls.

The break-up was over money. When GGG signed his lucrative deal with DAZN, his new advisors decided that henceforth Sanchez would receive a flat rate instead of his customary percentage. “Take it or leave it,” they told Abel. He left it.

“Money (often) corrupts character and values,” said Sanchez, who was deeply wounded when GGG turned his back on him. And although we didn’t delve into it, he likely had flashbacks to 1992 when the very same thing had happened to him with Terry Norris.

Terry Norris was Abel’s first prominent fighter. He trained Terry and his older brother Orlin Norris, a budding word cruiserweight champion, for the late Joe Sayatovich at Sayatovich’s training facility on a 30-acre ranch in the high desert community of Campo, California, five miles from the Mexican border. Sayatovich owned a construction company, as did Sanchez, a second generation California home builder.

In July of 1989, Terry Norris was bombed out in two rounds by Julian Jackson in Atlantic City in a bid for Jackson’s WBA 154-pound title. But Sanchez orchestrated a rebound and Norris went on to carve out a Hall of Fame career, preceding Julian Jackson into the International Boxing Hall of Fame by 14 years.

Norris was a world champion, but yet one of the lesser known champions until winning a lopsided 12-round decision over Sugar Ray Leonard on Feb. 9, 1991, at Madison Square Garden, plunging Sugar Ray into a six-year retirement. That increased Norris’s marketability enormously and spelled the beginning of the end of the Norris-Sanchez partnership. In November of the following year, Sanchez received a letter co-signed by Sayatovich and Norris (whose signature was apparently forged) telling him that he had been dismissed.

A story in the San Diego Union-Tribune quoted Sayatovich as saying that Abel had to go because he had become “too greedy,” balking at taking a smaller percentage of Terry Norris’s purses now that the fighter had punched his way into the upper echelon of wage earners. But the break-up did not disturb Sanchez’s relationship with Orlin Norris, or with the father and official co-trainer of the Norris brothers, both of whom jumped to Abel’s defense, saying he had remained loyal to Sayatovich and that Sayatovich ought to have reciprocated that loyalty.

There’s an old saying in boxing that a trainer or manager should never become too emotionally attached to a fighter as that fighter will break his heart someday. Abel Sanchez knows the feeling.

Terry Norris, detached from Sanchez, lost his WBC diadem in his 11th title defense when he suffered a fourth round stoppage at the hands of Simon Brown in Puebla, Mexico. A win over Brown would have propelled Norris into a match with Pernell Whitaker, and had he succeeded in beating Whitaker, he would have been the runaway pick for the top spot on the pound-for-pound lists.

Abel Sanchez wasn’t surprised that Norris was upended by Simon Brown, a huge underdog. “We watch him in the gym and he’s gotten away from basic fundamentals,” he told LA Times writer Tim Kawakami. “He’s going out there winging and trying to bomb everyone out. And when you do that you’re going to get hit.”

We mean no disrespect to Johnathan Banks, a fine trainer, but we can’t help but wonder if Gennady Golovkin’s career will take the same turn.

ANDY RUIZ

Abel Sanchez first met Andy Ruiz when Ruiz, an aspiring Olympian, was 17 years old. Ruiz’s father brought Andy to Abel’s gym. When they put the boy on the scale, he weighed 307 pounds. Ten years later, Sanchez would train Ruiz for Ruiz’s match with Joseph Parker in Auckland, New Zealand. Several fights later, Ruiz bought out his contract with Top Rank, signed with Premier Boxing Champions, and acquired a new trainer, Manny Robles.

We wondered what went through Abel’s mind as Andy Ruiz was chewing up Anthony Joshua and then rapturously celebrating with his cornermen in an unforgettable scene at Madison Square Garden. Did Abel think to himself, “well, darn, if I had played my cards right, that could have been me.”

To the contrary, Sanchez thought it was wonderful. “It was good for boxing,” he said, “I’m so happy for Andy and Manny.”

Sanchez agreed with our assessment that the quick turnaround after his bout with six-foot-seven, 260-pound behemoth Alexander Dimitrenko was actually a blessing in disguise. “On paper,” said Sanchez, “he had only five weeks to prepare but it was more like 14 weeks. Andy didn’t have time to go out and party.”

“Andy would not be denied,” said Sanchez who hopes that Ruiz brings the same mindset to the rematch. “I hope that his victory over Joshua doesn’t come to be seen as a fluke,” he said, “because Andy can really fight.” He doesn’t pack the biggest punch, noted Sanchez, but he can stop an opponent in his tracks with four- and five-punch combinations, a rare attribute in a heavyweight.

As what to expect in the rematch, Sanchez said, “Andy Ruiz will have to be even better than the first time around.”

Photo credit: Tom Hogan / Hogan photos / Golden Boy Promotions

Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel

To comment on this story in The Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Featured Articles

Boxing Odds and Ends: Crawford, Canelo, Caleb Plant and More

Arne K. Lang

Published

on

Boxing-Odds-and-Ends-Crawford-Canelo-Caleb-Plant-and-More

Boxing Odds and Ends: Crawford, Canelo, Caleb Plant and More

Although a lot of disinformation comes out of the mouths of boxing promoters, Bob Arum was apparently serious when he broached the idea of a two-fight series between Terence Crawford and Conor McGregor, the first fight to be conducted under MMA rules and the second under boxing rules.

Crawford is amenable. “I just have to have the proper time to prepare myself,” he told ESPN’s Dan Rafael. “…I haven’t been in that (wrestling) environment in a long time, but most definitely I feel I can compete with anyone given the proper time to train on the MMA side, being that I have a wrestling background.”

Crawford, 32, last wrestled in middle school so he would certainly need a refresher course. However, he would have a better chance of defeating Conor McGregor in an MMA match than McGregor would have of defeating him in a boxing match. So, if Arum’s proposed two-fight series ever comes off, the tailpiece may be unnecessary.

– – –

As first reported by ESPN’s Steve Kim, Andy Ruiz Jr. has dumped trainer Manny Robles. According to Kim’s report, Ruiz’s father informed Robles of the decision and said it was Al Haymon’s idea.

Andy Ruiz appears to be one of those people that can gain weight just looking at food. He weighed 297 ½ pounds for his pro debut at age 19, carried 268 pounds for his first meeting with Anthony Joshua, and ballooned up to 283 ½ for the rematch after leading reporters to believe that he had actually slimmed down for the sequel.

Ruiz, noted Kim, went from a feel-good story to a cautionary tale in just six months.

– – –

Who ya’ gonna believe?

A certain disreputable web site, bragging that it had an exclusive, told its readers that Canelo Alvarez had settled on Billy Joe Saunders as his next opponent and that they would meet on Cinco de Mayo in Las Vegas. The next day, Sports Illustrated’s Chris Mannix, a far more trustworthy source, reported that Ryota Murata had emerged as the frontrunner and that negotiations were underway to stage the fight in Japan.

Perhaps it makes sense for Canelo to promote his brand in a new market. However, if he fights Murata, who holds a WBA belt, he would reportedly be dropping back to 160 and at age 29 he appears to have outgrown the weight class.

Stay tuned.

– – –

If Caleb Plant were an NBA player, his name would be Kevin Love. Plant, who recently married FOX/PBC reporter Jordan Hardy, is the only U.S.-born, non-Hispanic white person among the various champions in the 17 weight divisions.

Plant, who hails from tiny Ashland City, Tenn. (23 miles from Nashville) defends his IBF super middleweight title on Feb. 15 at Nashville’s 20,000-seat Bridgestone Arena. In the opposite corner will be Germany’s Vincent Feigenbutz who will be making his U.S. debut.

The 24-year-old Feigenbutz, who turned pro at age 16, has won 10 straight and 30 of his last 31. He represents a big step up in class from Plant’s last opponent, Mike Lee, who was in way over his head.

– – –

A sad note from South Africa: Five days after the death of trailblazer Peter Mathebula, his widow, Emma Gabaitsiwe Mathebula, died suddenly of an apparent heart attack. Peter Mathebula’s funeral, originally set for Saturday, has been pushed back until Tuesday and will now be a joint funeral.

Mathebula, who won the WBA world flyweight title in 1980, basically died a pauper, having sold all of  his boxing memorabilia to keep his head above water. His heirs had reached out to the government for assistance in defraying the costs of his burial.

Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel 

To comment on this story in The Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Avila Perspective, Chap. 82: Jason Quigley Returns to SoCal and More

David A. Avila

Published

on

Avila-Perspective-Chap-82-Jason-Quigley-Returns-to-SoCal-and-More

Southern California prizefighting heats up with Jason Quigley headlining a fight card in Orange County and then, two days later, another fight card takes place in the heart of Los Angeles.

Ireland’s Quigley (17-1, 13 KOs) faces Mexico’s Fernando Marin (16-4-3, 12 KOs) on Thursday Jan. 23, at the OC Hangar in Costa Mesa, Calif. DAZN will stream the Golden Boy Promotions fight card live.

Quigley, 28, seeks to reclaim territory lost when he suffered a defeat last July against Tureano Johnson. Ironically, Marin would lose 10 days later in Hollywood to super welterweight contender Serhii Bohachuk.

For several years Quigley had trained in Southern California but decided to change trainers and location. He moved to Great Britain and still prepares near his native country but primarily fights in the U.S.

At one time Quigley clamored for a match against Gennady “GGG” Golovkin or Saul “Canelo” Alvarez but now finds himself trying to prove he belongs in the upper tier of the middleweight division. It’s loaded with talent.

Also on the same fight card will be popular North Hollywood super welterweight Ferdinand Kerobyan who was headed to contender status when he ran into Blair “the Flair” Cobbs. At the time Cobbs was an unknown quantity but no longer.

Kerobyan (13-1, 8 KOs) meets Azael Cosio (21-8-2) in an eight-round clash in the semi-main event at OC Hangar. Doors open at 5 p.m.

Red Boxing International

On Saturday Jan. 27, Red Boxing International hosts its first boxing card of the year at Leonardo’s Night Club located at 6617 Wilson Ave. L.A. 90001. Doors open at 5 p.m.

Super welterweight Bryan Flores (13-1, 6 KOs) meets Brandon Baue (15-17) in the main event  in the first event of the year for the ambitious promotion company. For the past two years Flores fought primarily in Tijuana, Mexico where he racked up six wins. Now he’s back on Southern California soil.

Another match features lightweights Angel Israel Rodriguez (5-0) facing off against Braulio Avila (3-6) in a six-round fight.

Rodriguez fights out of Pico Rivera, Calif. but recently fought in Costa Rica where he won by first round knockout in November. He will be fighting Avila who just fought two weeks ago at the Chumash Casino in Santa Ynez, Calif.

It’s a long fight card with 11 bouts on the schedule.

JRock and Rosario

Boxing fans received another lesson on never underestimating a ranked contender regardless of the name recognition.

Jeison Rosario knocked out Julian “J Rock” Williams who was making the first defense of the WBA and IBF super welterweight world titles he won last year in my selection as “Fight of the Year.”

Rosario walked in with little recognition and was thought to be a soggy piece of bread for Williams. The long armed Dominican fighter walloped Williams in front of his hometown fans in Philadelphia. It was yet another warning for fans to understand that anyone who steps in the boxing ring ranked as a contender can do the unthinkable. In this case Rosario knocked out the champion in five rounds.

Many felt Williams was far too skilled, especially on the inside where he showcased those skills last May against former titlist Jarret Hurd. It was a remarkable display of the art of inside fighting. But against Rosario, he never got a chance to exhibit those skills.

The loaded super welterweight division has another dangerous champion in Rosario.

Fights to Watch

Thurs. 6 p.m. DAZN – Jason Quigley (17-1) vs Fernando Marin (16-4-3).

Sat. 6 p.m. Showtime – Danny Garcia (35-2) vs Ivan Redkach (23-4-1).

Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel 

To comment on this story in The Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Recalling Three Big Fights in Miami, the Site of Super Bowl LIV

Arne K. Lang

Published

on

Recalling-Three-Big-Fights-in-Miami-the-Site-of-Super-Bowl-LIV

The San Francisco 49ers and Kansas City Chiefs collide on Feb. 2 in Miami in Super Bowl LIV (54) in what will assuredly be the biggest betting event to ever play out on American soil. It’s the 10th Super Bowl for the South Florida metropolis which ties it with New Orleans as the most frequent destination for football’s premier attraction.

With its heavily Latin population, Miami would seem to be natural for big fights. However, this hasn’t been the case. Several great champions fought here, including Roberto Duran who twice defended his world lightweight title in these parts, but these weren’t big fights. In the case of Duran, his opponents were lightly regarded and the Panamanian legend was still three years away from his first encounter with Sugar Ray Leonard, a match that increased his name recognition a hundred-fold.

There were, however, three fights in Miami that summoned the interest of virtually all of America’s A-list sportswriters. Here they are in reverse chronological order.

Aaron Pryor vs. Alexis Arguello (Nov. 12, 1982)

Alexis Arguello (72-5) was bidding to become boxing’s first four-division champion. In his way stood WBA junior welterweight title-holder Aaron Pryor (31-0, 29 KOs), a man now widely regarded as the best 140-pound boxer of all time.

Arguello, a Miami resident, having been exiled from his Nicaraguan homeland by the Sandanista rebel occupation, was a textbook boxer who defeated his opponents with surgical efficiency. Pryor was a typhoon. He mowed down his opponents with relentless pressure. It was a great style match-up and it didn’t disappoint. Contested before nearly 30,000 at Miami’s iconic Orange Bowl, Pryor vs. Arguello was a fight for the ages.

“There was power, finesse, poise, courage and a tremendous ebb and flow,” said Associated Press writer Ed Schuyler who dubbed it Manila in Miniature. In the ninth, 11th, and particularly the 13th rounds, Arguello hit Pryor with straight right hands that would have felled an ordinary fighter, but Pryor had an iron chin.

In the 14th, Pryor buckled Arguello’s knees with a straight right hand and then unloaded a furious combination as Arguello fell back against the ropes. He was out on feet when referee Stanley Cristodoulou intervened and he would lay prone on the canvas for several minutes before he could be removed to his dressing room.

Sonny Liston vs. Muhammad Ali (Feb. 25, 1964)

If you happen to find a poster for this fight with the name Muhammad Ali on it, don’t buy it. It’s bogus. Liston met up with Muhammad Ali in their second fight. In their first encounter, Liston opposed Cassius Clay.

Clay’s Louisville sponsors, after a brief flirtation with Archie Moore, settled on Angelo Dundee as his trainer. Angelo operated out of his brother Chris Dundee’s gym located at the corner of 5th Street and Washington Avenue in Miami Beach. The fighter who took the name Muhammad Ali trained here and kept a home in Miami for most of his first six years as a pro.

Clay/Ali was 22 years old and had only 19 fights under his belt when he was thrust against heavyweight champion Sonny Liston at the Miami Beach Convention Center. Liston was riding a 28-fight winning streak after back-to-back first-round blowouts of Floyd Patterson.

In a UPI survey, 43 of 46 boxing writers picked Liston. “Clay has no more chance of stopping Liston than the old red barn had of impeding a tornado,” wrote Nat Fleischer, the publisher of The Ring magazine.

This would be the first of many famous fights for Muhammad Ali who emerged victorious when Liston quit after the sixth frame citing an injured shoulder. What is not widely known, however, is that the fight, which was shown on closed-circuit in the U.S. and Canada, was a bust at the gate. The 16,448-seat Convention Center was only half full.

The expectation that Liston would take the lippy kid out in a hurry depressed sales, as did sky-high ticket prices ($250 tops when $100 was the norm). And there may have been more subtle factors. “This may not be the best place for a fight between two Negroes,” wrote Robert Lipsyte of the New York Times, cognizant that people of color were not welcome as guests at the ritzy beachfront hotels along Collins Avenue.

Jack Sharkey vs. W. L. (Young) Stribling (Feb. 27, 1929)

A big fight, as I define it, doesn’t have to be a blockbuster. An important fight that produces an upset automatically becomes a bigger fight in hindsight. The Sharkey-Stribling fight of 1929 didn’t draw an immense crowd by Jack Dempsey standards, but the turnout, reportedly 35,000, far exceeded expectations and the fight – which preceded Miami’s first Orange Bowl football game by six years — really established Miami as a potentially good place for a big sporting event.

Promoted by the Madison Square Garden Corporation, the bout was originally headed to a dog racing track but it quickly became obvious that a larger venue was needed. A stadium was erected on a Miami Beach polo field, taking the name Flamingo Park (not to be confused with the thoroughbred track of the same name).

Slated for 10 rounds, the bout was conceived as one of two “eliminators” to find a successor to Gene Tunney who had retired. What gave the fight it’s primary allure, however, was the North-South angle. Sharkey, born Joseph Zukauskas, hailed from Boston. Stribling, born into a family that traveled the fair circuit with a variety act, was from Macon, Georgia.

The fight, which aired on the NBC radio network, was a dud, a drab affair won by Sharkey who had the best of it in virtually every round. Both went on to fight Max Schmeling for the world heavyweight title. Stribling, dubbed the “King of the Canebrakes” by Damon Runyon, lost by TKO in fight that was stopped late in the 15th round. Sharkey took the title from Schmeling on a split decision after losing their first meeting on a foul.

Young Stribling died in a motorcycle crash at age 28, by which time he had engaged in 251 documented bouts, the great majority of which were set-ups. Jack Sharkey lived to be 91.

—-

The strong earnings of the Sharkey-Stribling bout inevitably drew the Madison Square Garden Corporation back to Miami for an encore. On Feb. 27, 1930, Jack Sharkey opposed England’s “Fainting” Phil Scott. Four years later, on March 1, 1834, Primo Carnera defended his world heavyweight title here against former light heavyweight champion Tommy Loughran, the Philadelphia Phantom.

Both bouts were big money losers, as were the great majority of major fights during this period. Eight months after the Sharkey-Stribling cash cow, the stock market crashed, plunging the United States into the Great Depression. Few Americans could afford to vacation in Florida, let alone travel anywhere for a big fight.

Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel 

To comment on this story in The Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading
Advertisement
WAR-DeLuca-The-Bazooka-Deploys-to-the-UK-for-a-Matchroom-Battle-vs-Kell-Brook
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

WAR DeLuca: “The Bazooka” Deploys to the UK for Matchroom Battle vs Kell Brook

In-Praise-of-Referees
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

In Praise of Referees

The-TSS-2019-Fight-of-the-Year-Naoya-Inoue-vs-Nonito-Donaire
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

The TSS 2019 Fight of the Year: Naoya Inoue vs. Nonito Donaire

The-Hauser-Report-Beterbiev-Meng-Fight-in-China-on-Doubt
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

The Hauser Report: Beterbiev-Meng Fight in China in Doubt

Boxing-in-2019-Great-Moments-but-Dark-Days
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Boxing in 2019: Great Moments but Also Dark Days

Looking-for-the-Fight-of-the-Decade?-Start-Your-Search-at-105-Pounds
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Looking for the Fight of the Decade? Start Your Search at 105 Pounds

For-Whom-the-Bell-Tolled-2019-Boxing-Obituaries-Part-Two
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

For Whom the Bell Tolled: 2019 Boxing Obituaries PART ONE

Avila-Perspective-Chap-78-Adventures-in-the-I.-E.-Favorite-Moments-and-Tank-Davis
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 78: Adventures in the I.E., Favorite Moments and Tank

The-Clash-on-the-Dunes-is-the-TSS-2019-Boxing Event-of-the-Year
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

The “Clash on the Dunes” is the TSS 2019 Boxing Event of the Year

Boxing-Notables-Lay-Bare-the-top-Storylines-of-2019-in-our-Newest-TSS-Survey
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Boxing Notables Lay Bare the Top Storylines of 2019 in Our Newest TSS Survey

For-Whom-the-Bell-Tolled-2019-Boxing-Obituaries-Part-Two
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

For Whom the Bell Tolled: 2019 Boxing Obituaries PART TWO

R.I.P.-Carlos-Sugar-DeLeon-the-Iron-Man-of-Cruiserweight-Title-Holders
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

R.I.P. Carlos “Sugar” DeLeon, The Iron Man of Cruiserweight Title-Holders

HITS-and-MISSES-on-the-Final-Weekend-of-2019
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

HITS and MISSES on the Final Weekend of 2019

Tyson-Fury-is-the-TSS-2019-Boxing-Personality-of-the-Year
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Tyson Fury is the TSS 2019 Boxing Personality of the Year

Fast-Results-from-Atlanta-Davis-TKOs-Gamboa-Jack-and-Uzcategui-Upset
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Fast Results from Atlanta: Davis TKOs Gamboa; Jack and Uzcategui Upset

Canelo-Alvarez-is-the-TSS-2019-Fighter-of-the-Year
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Canelo Alvarez is the TSS 2019 Fighter of the Year

Three-Punch-Combo-A-Wish-List-of-Easily-Makeable-Fights-for-2020
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Three Punch Combo: A Wish List of Easily Makeable Fights for 2020

British-Boxing-2019-in-Review
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

British Boxing 2019 in Review

Pablo-Cesar-Cano-is-the-TSS-2019-Comeback-Fighter-of-the-Year
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Pablo Cesar Cano is the TSS 2019 Comeback Fighter of the Year

Avila-Perspective-Chap-79-Boxing-101-Part-One
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 79: Boxing 101 (Part One)

Boxing-Odds-and-Ends-Crawford-Canelo-Caleb-Plant-and-More
Featured Articles1 day ago

Boxing Odds and Ends: Crawford, Canelo, Caleb Plant and More

Avila-Perspective-Chap-82-Jason-Quigley-Returns-to-SoCal-and-More
Featured Articles2 days ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 82: Jason Quigley Returns to SoCal and More

Recalling-Three-Big-Fights-in-Miami-the-Site-of-Super-Bowl-LIV
Featured Articles2 days ago

Recalling Three Big Fights in Miami, the Site of Super Bowl LIV

Star-Power-Ryan-Garcia-and-Oscar-De-La-Hoya-at-West-LA-Gym
Featured Articles3 days ago

Star Power: Ryan Garcia and Oscar De La Hoya at West L.A. Gym

The-Much-Maligned-Boxing-Judge
Featured Articles3 days ago

The Much Maligned Boxing Judge

Jeison-Rosario's-Upset-Crowns-This-Week's-Edition-of-Hits-and-Misses
Featured Articles4 days ago

Jeison Rosario’s Upset Crowns This Week’s Edition of HITS and MISSES

South-African-Trailblazer-Peter-Mathebula-Dead-at-Age-67
Featured Articles5 days ago

South African Trailblazer Peter Mathebula Dead at Age 67

Ringside-in-Verona-Alvarez-Capsizes-Seals-Plus-Undercard-Results
Featured Articles5 days ago

Ringside in Verona: Alvarez Capsizes Seals Plus Undercard Results

Fast-Results-from-Philadelphia-Rosario-TKOs-J-Rock-in-a-Shocker
Featured Articles6 days ago

Fast Results from Philadelphia: Rosario TKOs ‘J-Rock’ in a Shocker

The-Top-Ten-Heavyweights-of-the-Decade-2010-2019
Featured Articles6 days ago

The Top Ten Heavyweights of the Decade 2010-2019

Press-Release-the-BWAA-Names-Floyd-Mayweather-Jr-the-Fighter-of-the-Decade
Featured Articles7 days ago

Press Release: The BWAA Names Floyd Mayweather Jr the Fighter of the Decade

Tonight's-ShoBox-Telecast-is-Another-Milestone-for-the-Long-Running-Series
Featured Articles1 week ago

Tonight’s ‘ShoBox’ Telecast is Another Milestone for the Long-Running Series

Avila-Perspective-Chap-81-Robert-Garcia's-Boxing-Academy-J-Rock-and-More
Featured Articles1 week ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 81: Robert Garcia’s Boxing Academy, ‘J-Rock’ and More

Julian-J-Rock-Williams-From-a-Homeless-Teenager-to-a-World-Boxing-Champ
Featured Articles1 week ago

Julian “J-Rock” Williams: From a Homeless Teenager to a World Boxing Champ

Tyson-Fury's-Daffy-Training-Regimen-has-Nat-Fleischer-Spinning-in-his-Grave
Featured Articles1 week ago

Tyson Fury’s Daffy Training Regimen has Nat Fleischer Spinning in his Grave

In-L.A.-Tyson-Fury-Promises-Hagler-hearns-Type-Fight-Wilder-Smiles
Featured Articles1 week ago

In L.A., Tyson Fury Promises Hagler-Hearns Type Fight; Wilder Smiles

Munguia-and-Ennis-Earn-Raves-in-this-Latest-Installment-of-Hits-and-Misses
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Munguia and Ennis Earn Raves in this Latest Installment of HITS and MISSES

In-Praise-of-Referees
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

In Praise of Referees

3-Punch-Combo-Notes-on-Saturday's-Top-Rank-Card-and-Friday's-Sho-Box-Overture
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

3 Punch Combo: Notes on Saturday’s Top Rank Card and Friday’s ‘Sho-Box’ Overture

Fast-Results-from-San-Antonio-Munguia-TKOs-Brave-But-Outgunned-O'Sullivan
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Fast Results from San Antonio: Munguia TKOs Brave but Out-gunned O’Sullivan

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Advertisement