Connect with us

Featured Articles

Errol Spence Wins Split Decision and Other Results from L.A.

David A. Avila

Published

on

Errol-Spence-Wins-Split-Decision-and-Other-Results-from-LA

LOS ANGELES-Sometimes long shots pay off but not this time, as heavily favored IBF welterweight titlist Errol Spence Jr. eked out a victory over Shawn Porter to add the WBC welterweight world title to his collection on Saturday.

If this were thoroughbred horse racing the long shot would have paid off, instead it was prizefighting and Spence Jr. used a single left cross to Porter’s chin to separate himself and win the unification battle before a crowd of more than 16,000 fans at Staples Center.

For 12 solid rounds both Spence and Porter displayed how they reached championship status with two distinctly different but successful styles.

Porter jumped on Spence with his special blend of pressure fighting featuring head movement, side steps and barging forward with both fists pumping from all angles against the thin-framed southpaw Texan.

It took Spence several rounds to adapt.

Despite the steady pressure of Porter, the composed Spence relied on his high guard and pivots to evade the rushes of the eager Ohio fighter. Around the third round Spence began finding success with stinging shots to the body, especially with the left uppercut dig. But most of the punches were fired from close range.

Not wanting to show weakness, Porter opened up the fourth round with even more vigor and seldom allowed Spence his footing. In the following round Spence recaptured the lost ground with his own intensified attack. Back and forth each rallied against the other.

During a savage Porter attack in the 11th round, the clever Spence delivered a crisp sidewinder left cross to the shorter fighter’s chin and down went “Showtime” Porter. You could see that the Ohioan knew that could be the difference in the fight when his hand touched the canvas.

Porter acknowledged the knockdown to Spence then urged him to try it again. The round ended with no further examples of power but the confidence seemed to seep out of Porter’s usually confident face. Inside he knew that single left cross could be the difference between winning or losing. It was a three-point swing in scoring because Porter was winning the round until the knockdown.

The final round saw both try to open up, but they were either tired or cautious and it was difficult to pick the winner of the final frame. After 12 rounds one judge scored it 115-112 for Porter while two others scored it 116-111 for Spence who becomes the WBC and IBF welterweight champion.

“I give it to Shawn Porter, he’s a rough and tough fighter,” said Spence after the decision was read. “He always comes to fight. I wanted to show that I could sit there and hang with him.”

Porter was very gracious in defeat.

“He’s a strong kid. He got the split decision, he was victorious,” said Porter. “I think the knockdown was the difference.”

Benavidez Regains Title

David Benavidez (22-0, 19 KOs) regained the WBC super middleweight world title by knockout from titlist Anthony Dirrell (33-2-1, 24 KOs) when Dirrell’s corner asked the referee to stop the pummeling in the second half of the fight.

Until the eighth round the taller and younger Benavidez was in control of the fight but Dirrell refused to quit despite a gash above his right eye suffered during a heated exchange. Benavidez repeatedly battered Dirrell with wicked combinations but the Flint, Mich. fighter kept looking for a knockout blow through the blood and hammering.

The ringside physician inspected Dirrell’s eye on several occasion from the sixth round on but the fight resumed. And when Benavidez connected with heavy blows from there on, Dirrell refused to go down. It was an impressive display of valor.

In the eighth round Benavidez opened up with impunity and had Dirrell trapped in a corner when one the Michigan fighter’s cornermen asked to stop the fight. An inspector waved a towel as Benavidez battered Dirrell and referee Tom Taylor finally noticed and stopped the fight at 1:39 of round eight. Benavidez was declared the new WBC super middleweight world champion.

“It’s probably the hardest fight that I’ve been in; a very tactical fight. It wasn’t easy,” said Benavidez who hugged Dirrell immediately after the fight ended. “Now I’m a two-time world champion. I got a lot of respect for him.”

The respect was acknowledged several times during the fight as Dirrell asked to continue despite the bleeding cut and opportunities offered by the referee and ringside physician.

“I felt him. He fought his ass off and he did what he had to win the title,” said Dirrell. “Of course I could have kept going. I didn’t quit, I kept going. He likes to get in the inside. He’s a true champion.”

Benavidez reclaimed the WBC title he lost last year due to a failed drug test. When he had first won the title he was the youngest ever to win the title at 168 pounds.

Barrios

A battle for the WBA super lightweight world title saw Mario Barrios (25-0, 16 KOs) floor Russia’s Batyr Akhmedov (7-1, 6 KOs) in the fourth round and seem in total control. But after the knockdown, Akhmedov rallied furiously and mounted pressure on the taller fighter from San Antonio to win the later rounds.

Barrios was able to use his quickness and length at first, but once Akhmedov got inside he took control, especially in the second half of the fight. In the final round, with the Russian fighter winning many of the later rounds with pressure, Barrios connected with a well-placed right hand missile that dropped Akhmedov. He beat the count but lost the momentum and the round.

All three judges scored it for Barrios 114-112, 115-111, 116-111 who now holds the WBA world title in a division ripe with many talented fighters.

Josesito Wins

Josesito “Riverside Rocky” Lopez (37-8, 20 KOs) won by knockout over fellow warrior John “The Gladiator” Molina (30-9, 24 KOs) in the eighth round in a fight that surprised some that it passed the first round in a welterweight clash.

Lopez jumped on Molina with a lead right cross and floored Molina early in the first round. When the fight resumed Lopez decked Molina again with a counter right cross and it didn’t look good. But he survived.

If you followed Molina’s career, you know that he’s been floored before early in several fights and rallied to win by knockout. But not this time. Though Molina set several traps, Lopez was wary of them and used a long left jab and side steps to stay out of Molina’s power zone. It proved beneficial.

Molina mounted a rally in the fifth round when he connected with multiple overhand rights. One seemed to stun Lopez but he managed to avoid the follow-up blows from Molina.

In the seventh round, Lopez surprised Molina with a stiff jab and right cross and down went Molina for the first time since the first round. Lopez attacked until the bell ended the round.

“I knew John Molina was not going to quit. He’s a warrior,” said Lopez. “I had to keep on the pressure.”

After a lengthy huddle with the ringside physicians and Molina’s trainers, he was allowed to proceed to the eighth round. Lopez did not waste time and unleashed a furious five-punch combination that snapped Molina’s head back. Referee Ray Corona saw enough and stopped the fight with Molina standing at 39 seconds into the eighth round.

“It was a pleasure being in the ring with John Molina. I’m very thankful for all of these opportunities,” said Lopez.

Ghost

Former multiple-weight world champion Robert “The Ghost” Guerrero (36-6-1, 20 KOs)  looked sharp against an awkward but stealthy foe in Jerry Thomas (14-2-1, 8 KOs) of Kansas and won by unanimous decision after 10 rounds in a welterweight clash.

Thomas had a jitterbug type of defense and though it was tough to gauge, Guerrero has seen every type of style in his near 20-year career and pummeled the body. And when there was any doubt, he pummeled the body again.

Guerrero was in control for almost all 10 rounds but Thomas had his best round in the ninth round when he changed gears from all-defense to all-offense. The braided Thomas landed some flush uppercuts from the left and right and would not allow Guerrero to counter. Still, Guerrero slipped out of the attack and the round came to a conclusion. It was the only round Guerrero did not win.

Two judges scored it 99-91 and another 98-92 for Guerrero who fights out of Gilroy, Calif. the site of the assault by gunfire that took the lives of four at a Garlic Festival in August. Guerrero pledged to give part of his purse to the victim’s families.

Prelims

Michigan’s hard-hitting super welterweight Joey Spencer (9-0, 7 KOs) clobbered Travis Gambardella (5-1-2, 2 KOs) with body shots and double hooks to the head, dropping the Northeasterner three times in two rounds. Then Gambardella buckled down and fought back, connecting with a right that made Spencer pause. It looked like a competitive fight was on the horizon in the third round but when Spencer connected with a left hook to the head, referee Ray Corona stopped the fight. Gambardella argued to keep going but the fight was ruled over at 56 seconds of round three.

“He had been down three times. I think the ref didn’t want another tragic event and stopped the fight,” said Spencer.

Michoacan’s Jose “El Rayo” Valenzuela (5-0, 2 KOs), a southpaw, fired a double left cross to knock out Charles Clark (2-5-1, 1 KO) of Dallas in the first round of a super featherweight bout. After some tentative exchanges, Valenzuela and Clark opened up and the Mexican struck fast with a lead left cross and another one as Clark tumbled to the floor. The referee did not bother to count and ended the fight at 1:06 of the first round.

Photo credit: Al Applerose

Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel  

To comment on this story in The Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Featured Articles

Ryan Garcia, Canelo’s Protege, Announces Fight With Manny Pacquiao

Kelsey McCarson

Published

on

Ryan-Garcia-Canelo's-Protege-Announces-Fight-With-Manny-Pacquiao

Ryan Garcia has just about everything he needs to become the next Canelo Alvarez, even the champ’s terrific training team led by Mexico’s Eddy Reynoso.

“It’s great, man. They support me. They stay by my side. They believe in me. They know what they see, even Canelo,” Garcia told me before his last fight.

So, it should come to no surprise that the 22-year-old lightweight contender would be attempting to pull off the same kind of trick that led to Alvarez’s first and only loss in the professional ranks, but the same one that probably helped the Mexican more than any other as a learning experience inside a boxing ring.

Just as Alvarez did in securing his 12-round dance with boxing legend Floyd Mayweather Jr. back in 2013, Garcia wants to sign up for the same kind of tango with boxing superstar Manny Pacquiao.

“I’ve been boxing my whole life, and I’ve been ready for the biggest fights,” Garcia said.

Lots of fighters say things like that, but almost nobody actually attempts to do it.

Alvarez does.

Now, Garcia does, too.

“Canelo brings me to the side at times out of nowhere and says ‘you’re one of the most talented fighters I’ve ever seen in my life. I just want you to work as hard as I do and you’re going to have the world’,” Garcia said.

On Sunday, Garcia posted via Instagram that his dream fight vs. Pacquiao was a done deal, though it’s important to note no other confirmations of any kind have followed that post.

Additionally, the promotional poster used by the social media superstar in his announcement didn’t look official, and Pacquiao has remained eerily silent about the matter publicly.

Still, Garcia seems to believe his next fight will be against Pacquiao, and it must be a near-enough reality that everyone else involved with the matter has decided to remain silent until everything is sorted out.

“I want to leave a true legacy when I’m done with the game,” Garcia said.

That Garcia even wants to face Pacquiao right now testifies to that truth, and it’s absolutely something worth celebrating.

The undefeated Instagram idol might have over 8.3 million followers for many reasons, but the most notable claim Garcia has to the mantle of being boxing’s next big thing is less about those attributes and more about the talent, skill, and ability he possesses inside a boxing ring.

To put it another way, it’s one thing to be as handsome as Oscar De La Hoya. It’s quite another to actually fight like him.

Case in point, Garcia is coming off the most important win of his career.

Making good on his pre-fight promise to stop Olympic gold medalist and world title challenger Luke Campbell on January 2 was an important rung to take on the ladder to success, and that became especially true after Campbell dumped the prodigy to the canvas in the second round of the fight.

But Garcia weathered that early storm and eventually came back to pull the stoppage win over Campbell five rounds later.

Nobody had done that before. Campbell went 12 full rounds with both Vasyl Lomachenko and Jorge Linares in previous losing efforts against world-class lightweights, so Garcia’s stoppage win was more evidence that he’s legitimately special where it matters most.

After his viral knockout, Garcia was lauded by some of the most notable sports celebrities on the planet. The kid can barely purchase alcohol in all 50 states and his massive fanbase already includes the likes LeBron James, Damian Lillard, and Carlos Correa.

In some ways, that puts Garcia way ahead of Alvarez’s early all-star pace, at least at the level of notoriety.

Say what you want about Garcia’s social media-centric fanbase, the incredible level of fame the American has already achieved was previously only reserved for the likes of specific Olympic gold medal winners with a perfect mix of qualities.

De La Hoya comes to mind again, and that type of talent only comes around once a generation in our sport.

Look, Garcia isn’t ready for Pacquiao.

In fact, one can easily argue that the 23-year-old Alvarez that lost to Mayweather eight years ago was way more prepared for that fight than Garcia is right now for Pacquiao.

And we all know how that one went.

But Garcia’s daring attempt at making such a huge splash at such a young age is a wonder to behold.

A rising superstar like Garcia choosing to go against the conventional wisdom that would otherwise tell him to steer clear of fights he’ll probably lose is a breath of fresh air.

The reason he wants to do things like that is just as great.

“I have a gift. I’m a true talent. I can’t let all that go to waste,” Garcia said.

Check out more boxing news on video at the Boxing Channel 

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Fulton Wins Inside War to Win WBO Title and Other Results from Connecticut

David A. Avila

Published

on

Fulton-Wins-Inside-War-to-Win-WBO-Title-and-Other-Results-from-Connecticut

This time Stephen Fulton passed the Covid-19 test and then out-worked Angelo Leo in a brutal inside war to take the WBO super bantamweight world title by unanimous decision on Saturday.

Philadelphia’s Fulton (19-0, 8 KOs) was supposed to box and move against the body puncher Leo (20-1, 9 KOs) of Las Vegas but instead banged his way to victory with an artful display of inside fighting at the Mohegan Sun Casino in Uncasville, Conn.

When Leo won the world title during this past summer, he was supposed to fight Fulton, but Fulton showed positive on a Covid-19 test and was forced out of the fight. Not this time. Instead, the Philly fighter would not be denied.

Fulton planted his feet and banged to the body against body shot artist Leo and kept it going toe-to-toe for most of the 12 rounds.

Leo had his moments and was able to start slightly quicker, but by the sixth round it seemed Fulton was the stronger fighter down the stretch.

“He started breathing a little harder,” said Fulton. “I pushed myself to the limit in training.”

It showed.

Fulton took control for the last four rounds and just seemed fresher and more active to win by unanimous decision. Despite fighting primarily inside, the Philly fighter seemed comfortable.

“The game plan was to box at first. But I had to get a little dirty,” Fulton said. “I made it a dog fight.”

All three judges scored it for Fulton: 118-110 and 119-109 twice. TheSweetscience.com scored it 115-113 for Fulton who now holds the WBO super bantamweight world title.

“I’m the only champion Philadelphia has,” said Fulton.

Aleem KOs Pasillas

A battle between undefeated power-hitting super bantamweights saw Ra’eese Aleem (18-0, 12 KOs) knock down East L.A.’s Vic Pasillas (16-1, 9 KOs) multiple times before ending the fight in the 11th round.

“I believe I put an exclamation point in my victory,” said Aleem who trains in Las Vegas but is a native of Michigan.

Aleem showed off his quickness and power in both hands that resulted in knock downs of Pasillas in the second, sixth, ninth and 11th rounds. It seemed that Pasillas never could figure out how to combat the awkward looping blows and quickness of Aleem.

Pasillas had a few moments with his ability to score with counter lefts and right hooks from his southpaw stance. But every time he scored big Aleem would rally back with even more explosive blows.

As Aleem mounted a large lead, Pasillas looked to set up a needed knockout blow but was instead caught with an overhand right to the chin and a finishing left that forced the referee to stop the fight at 1:00 of the 11th round.

Aleem picks up the interim WBA super bantamweight title. It’s basically a title that signifies he is the number one contender.

Lightweights

Rolando Romero (13-0, 11 KOs) floored Avery Sparrow (10-3, 3 KOs) in the first round and then exhibited his boxing skills to win by technical knockout.

It looked like the fight was going to end early when Romero caught Sparrow with a left hook. But Philadelphia’s Sparrow survived the first round and the next few rounds to slow down the attacking Romero. Things settled down but Romero kept winning the rounds.

Sparrow dropped to the floor during an exchange of blows in the sixth round which the referee quickly ruled “no knockdown.” Noticeably in pain Sparrow was under full assault from Romero and resorted to firing low blows. The referee deducted two points from Sparrow for the infraction.

The Philadelphia fighter limped out with a still gimpy knee to compete in the seventh round but within a minute Sparrow’s corner signaled to the referee to stop the fight. The stoppage gave Romero the win by technical knockout at 43 seconds into the round.

Check out more boxing news on video at the Boxing Channel 

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Boxers Fighting the Best and Doing It Again for the First Time: Part Two

Ted Sares

Published

on

Boxers-Fighting-the-Best-and-Doing-It-Again-for-the-First-Time-Part-Two

Boxers Fighting the Best and Doing It Again for the First Time: Part Two

As mentioned in Part One, the phrase “cherry picking” gained meaningful traction during the time “Money” Mayweather was making his run. A new and very simple business model seemed to fuel it; namely, make the most money the quickest way with the least amount of risk and that translated into fewer fights. The change was almost imperceptible.

WBC featherweight champion Gary Russell Jr. (31-1) has fought once a year sine 2014. WBO middleweight king Demetrius Andrade (39-0) started out fast but then fell into a less active mode. Wlad Klitschko began to pick his spots with more caution as he met the likes of Francesco Pianeta and Alex Leapai. Shane Mosley slowed down towards the end and even Guillermo Rigondeaux (20-1) has faded from the headlines after being stopped by Vasyl Lomachenko.

Back to the Future

Suddenly, however, a twist has emerged that suggests a new model may well be in the offing; to wit: make the most money the quickest way but with lesser regard to risk. Perhaps Daniel Dubois fighting Joe Joyce last November was an example. Translated, it could mean that the best will fight the best as they did in days of yore. If so, Mega- possibilities await.

“I Want All The Belts, No Easy Fights, I Want To Face The Best.” –Virgil Ortiz

Ryan “King Ry” Garcia (21-0) has called out everyone and anybody and it appears he might get his wish in Devin “The Dream” Haney (25-0) or maybe the exciting Gervonta “Tank” Davis (24-0).

The new breed of Davis, Garcia, Haney and Teofimo “The Takeover” Lopez is being is being compared to the “Four Kings” (Leonard, Hearns, Hagler, Duran) but a flattered Devin Haney wisely notes “those guys fought each other.”

In this connection, writer James Slater nails it as follows: “Right now, in today’s boxing world, Haney, Lopez, Davis and Garcia could all do well, they could win a title or two and they could pick up some huge paydays, without fighting each other. This is the state the sport is in these days. It’s up to the fighters to really WANT to take take the risks, to take on their most dangerous rivals. The ‘Four Kings’ did it, time and again, and this is what added enormously to their greatness.”

Teofimo Lopez did it. After shocking Richard Commey, he beat Vasyl Lomachenko in an even more shocking outcome and now wants George Kambosos, Jr. to step aside for a Devin Haney fight.

It doesn’t get any better than the specter of Errol Spence Jr. (27-0) fighting “Bud” Crawford (37-0) unless it’s Tyson Fury (30-0-1) meeting Anthony Joshua (24-1.) If Covid 19 is under control, they could do this one in front of 100,000 fans.

Josh Taylor has talked about challenging Lopez even if it means dropping down to lightweight, and then moving up to 147 to challenge Crawford or Spence.

Dillian Whyte rematching with Alexander Povetkin is another highly anticipated fray and has the added dimension of being a crossroads affair. Oleksandr Usyk will likely face off with Joe Joyce in Usyk’s first real test as a heavyweight.

In late February there’s a big domestic showdown in New Zealand between heavyweights Joseph Parker and Junior Fa. On that same date In London, Carl Frampton squares off with slick WBO 130-pound champion Jamel Herring.

And Juan Francisco Estrada rematching with a rejuvenated Roman “Chocolatito” Gonzalez has everyone’s attention.

Super exciting Joe Smith Jr. meets Russia’s Maxim Vlasov for the vacant WBA light heavyweight belt. What’s not to like?

The showdown between Miguel Berchelt (38-1) and Oscar Valdez (28-0) is the best on the February docket and could end up being a FOTY.

Speaking of FOTY’s, the prospect of Naoya “Monster” Inoue vs. Kazuto Ioka is as mouthwatering as it can get and has global appeal.

Meanwhile, Artur Beterbiev looms and it’s not a question of opponents as much as it’s a question of who wants to contend with his bludgeoning style of destruction.

Claressa Shields, Marie Eve Dicaire, Katie Taylor, Amanda Serrano, Delfine Persoon, Jessica McCaskill, and Layla McCarter are prepared to make female boxing sizzle. In the final analysis,  when Vasyl Lomachenko becomes an opponent, you know something is very different.

You can read Part One HERE

Ted Sares can be reached at tedsares@roadrunner.com

Check out more boxing news on video at the Boxing Channel 

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Eddy-Reynoso-is-the-TSS-2020-Trainer-of-the-Year.jpg
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Eddy Reynoso is the TSS 2020 Trainer of the Year

Austin-Ammo-Williams-is-the-TSS-2020-Prospect-of-the-Year
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Austin “Ammo” Williams is the TSS 2020 Prospect of the Year

Goodbye-To-All-That-A-Review-of-Mike-Silver's-The-Night-The-Referee-Hit-Back
Book Review2 weeks ago

Goodbye To All Of That: A Review of Mike Silver’s ‘The Night the Referee Hit Back’

Kazuto-Ioka-Sensationally-Crushes-Kosei-Tanaka-in-Japanese-Superfight
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Kazuto Ioka Sensationally Crushes Kosei Tanaka in Japanese Superfight

Fast-Results-from-the-Big-D-Garcia-KOs-Campbell-A-Split-for-the-Alvrado-Twins
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Fast Results from the “Big D”: Garcia KOs Campbell; A Split for the Alvarado Twins

Ryan-Garcia-Canelo's-Protege-Announces-Fight-With-Manny-Pacquiao
Featured Articles1 day ago

Ryan Garcia, Canelo’s Protege, Announces Fight With Manny Pacquiao

Boxers-Fighting-the-Best-and-Doing-It-Again-for-the-First-Time
Featured Articles1 week ago

Boxers Fighting the Best and Doing It Again for the First Time: Part One

How-I-Became-a-Boxing-Writer
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

How I Became a Boxing Writer

Boxing-in-the-Age-of-the-New-Normal-2020-in-Review
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

 Boxing in the Age of the New Normal: 2020 in Review

Avila-Perspective-Chap-120-Boxing's-Best-Pound-for-Pound
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 120: Boxing’s Best Pound for Pound

Boxers-Fighting-the-Best-and-Doing-It-Again-for-the-First-Time-Part-Two
Featured Articles3 days ago

Boxers Fighting the Best and Doing It Again for the First Time: Part Two

George-Foreman-vs-Ron-Lyle-A-Watershed-Fight-in-the-Annals-of-Modern-Boxing
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

George Foreman vs. Ron Lyle: A Watershed Fight in the Annals of Modern Boxing

Did-The-Hoodlum-Element-Rule-Boxing-in-the-1950s?-A-Dissenting-Opinion
Book Review3 weeks ago

Did The Hoodlum Element Rule Boxing in the 1950s? A Dissenting Opinion

HITS-and-MISSES-Ryan-Garcia-Kazuto-Ioka-and-More
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

HITS and MISSES: Ryan Garcia, Kazuto Ioka and More

For-Whom-The-Bell-Tolled-2020-Boxing-Obituaries-Part-Two
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

For Whom The Bell Tolled: 2020 Boxing Obituaries PART TWO

Hank-Aaron-and-Muhammad-Ali
Featured Articles4 days ago

Hank Aaron and Muhammad Ali

Can-Luke-Campbell-Dim-Ryan-Garcia's-Bright-Star
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Can Luke Campbell Dim Ryan Garcia’s Bright Star?

Teofimo-Lopez-is-the-TSS-2020-Fighter-of-the-Year
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Teofimo Lopez is the TSS 2020 Fighter of the Year

Crossover-Star-Holly-Holm-Adds-New-Dimensions-to-Claressa-Shields
Featured Articles1 week ago

Crossover star Holly Holm Adds New Dimensions to Claressa Shields

For-Whom-the-Bell-Tolled-2020-Boxing-Obituaries-PART-ONE
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

For Whom the Bell Tolled: 2020 Boxing Obituaries PART ONE

Ryan-Garcia-Canelo's-Protege-Announces-Fight-With-Manny-Pacquiao
Featured Articles1 day ago

Ryan Garcia, Canelo’s Protege, Announces Fight With Manny Pacquiao

Fulton-Wins-Inside-War-to-Win-WBO-Title-and-Other-Results-from-Connecticut
Featured Articles3 days ago

Fulton Wins Inside War to Win WBO Title and Other Results from Connecticut

Boxers-Fighting-the-Best-and-Doing-It-Again-for-the-First-Time-Part-Two
Featured Articles3 days ago

Boxers Fighting the Best and Doing It Again for the First Time: Part Two

Vic-Pasillas-An-East-LA-Fighter
Featured Articles4 days ago

Vic Pasillas: An East L.A. Fighter

Hank-Aaron-and-Muhammad-Ali
Featured Articles4 days ago

Hank Aaron and Muhammad Ali

The-Ups-and-Downs-of-Hall-of-Fame-Boxing-Writer-Jack-Fiske
Featured Articles5 days ago

The Ups and Downs of Hall of Fame Boxing Writer Jack Fiske

Michael-Coffie-vs-Darmani-Rock-Smacks-of-Joe-Joyce-vs-Daniel-Dubois
Featured Articles6 days ago

Michael Coffie vs. Darmani Rock Smacks of Joe Joyce vs. Daniel Dubois

One-Night-in-Miami-Film-Review-by-Thomas-Hauser
Featured Articles1 week ago

“One Night in Miami”: Film Review by Thomas Hauser

Crossover-Star-Holly-Holm-Adds-New-Dimensions-to-Claressa-Shields
Featured Articles1 week ago

Crossover star Holly Holm Adds New Dimensions to Claressa Shields

Boxers-Fighting-the-Best-and-Doing-It-Again-for-the-First-Time
Featured Articles1 week ago

Boxers Fighting the Best and Doing It Again for the First Time: Part One

At-the-Moment-Boxing-is-Dormant-but-There-Will-Be-Fireworks-Aplenty-in-February
Featured Articles1 week ago

At the Moment Boxing is Dormant, but There Will Be Fireworks Aplenty in February

Avila-Perspective-Chap-121-Boxing-in-2021
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 121: Prizefighting in 2021

Remembering-Young-Stribling-on-the-Centennial-of-his-First-Pro-Fight
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Remembering Young Stribling on the Centennial of his First Pro Fight

R.I.P.-Boxing-Promoter-Mike-Acri
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

R.I.P. Boxing Promoter Mike Acri

George-Foreman-vs-Ron-Lyle-A-Watershed-Fight-in-the-Annals-of-Modern-Boxing
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

George Foreman vs. Ron Lyle: A Watershed Fight in the Annals of Modern Boxing

Goodbye-To-All-That-A-Review-of-Mike-Silver's-The-Night-The-Referee-Hit-Back
Book Review2 weeks ago

Goodbye To All Of That: A Review of Mike Silver’s ‘The Night the Referee Hit Back’

Avila-Perspective-Chap-120-Boxing's-Best-Pound-for-Pound
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 120: Boxing’s Best Pound for Pound

Did-The-Hoodlum-Element-Rule-Boxing-in-the-1950s?-A-Dissenting-Opinion
Book Review3 weeks ago

Did The Hoodlum Element Rule Boxing in the 1950s? A Dissenting Opinion

HITS-and-MISSES-Ryan-Garcia-Kazuto-Ioka-and-More
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

HITS and MISSES: Ryan Garcia, Kazuto Ioka and More

Boxing-in-the-Age-of-the-New-Normal-2020-in-Review
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

 Boxing in the Age of the New Normal: 2020 in Review

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Advertisement