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Eddy Reynoso is The TSS 2019 Trainer of the Year

David A. Avila

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Years ago a legendary fight manager once advised “don’t be a guy who prepares fighters, be a professor who teaches boxing.”

Those words forever guide our Trainer of the Year for 2019, Mexico’s Eddy Reynoso who mentors dozens of pugilists including four-division world champion Saul “Canelo” Alvarez, considered by many the best fighter today pound for pound.

It all began in a boxing gym in Guadalajara while watching his father Jose “Chepo” Reynoso work with hundreds of hungry Mexican youngsters starving for fame and stardom in a tiny gym called Julian Magdaleno.

Jose “Chepo” Reynoso was already established as a boxing trainer in the Guadalajara area. At day he was a butcher, at night he toiled in the boxing gym showing youngsters the tools of the fight trade.

“I was eight years old when I first walked into the gym in Guadalajara,” remembers Eddy Reynoso. “Thank God I listened to my father who said I should become a trainer in my father’s gym.”

Their first world champion together was Oscar “Chololo” Larios in 2002.

“I started doing some of the training during the entire time that Larios was a world champion. That’s when I learned together with my father,” said Reynoso.

Another who remembers that period is Riverside trainer Willy Silva, a friend of the Reynosos, whose gym was a stopping point for Larios and for Javier Jauregui, another of their world champions who would fight in the U.S.

“It was about 15 years ago when they used to bring “Chatito” Jauregui and “Chololo” Larios to our gym. Eddy was training and also trying to lose some weight. At that time he didn’t know that much, but he was very good at studying things about boxing,” said Silva, who trained Mauricio Herrera, Carlos “El Elegante” Bojorquez and Jose Reynoso, the nephew of Chepo Reynoso.

Mendoza Influence

While continuing to work with his father, a legendary fight manager, Rafael Mendoza noticed the younger Reynoso working with many of the aspiring prizefighters. One day the manager and advisor for 25 former world champions approached the son of “Chepo” Reynoso and gave the advice that would be his guiding light in the world of professional boxing.

“He told me anyone can hold the mitts,” said Eddy Reynoso about Mendoza’s advice. “Be a professor that teaches boxing. Show them the art of boxing.”

It fueled his desire to create his own path and boxing philosophy.

During this time a redheaded youngster walked into their gym who was one of six Alvarez brothers – his name Saul “Canelo” Alvarez.

“Really his hair is what I remember most. He really surprised me with his red hair and face, it was not very common in Mexico,” said Reynoso who was 25 at the time and Alvarez 13. “He caught my attention for being how small and strong he was.”

Though Alvarez was very powerful even at a young age, the Reynosos preferred to teach him a style not too common with Mexican prizefighters – counterpunching.

“It’s something we had been taught as kids and I as a kid always liked counter punching. I always studied fighters like Jose Medel and Gilberto Roman. I started implementing that as well as the old school style of fighting,” said Reynoso.

Both father and son realized they had a special fighter in Canelo Alvarez. From the very beginning they realized he could advance further than even their previous world champions.

Mayweather to Kovalev

Through all of Alvarez’s fights, the Reynosos always felt he was the stronger fighter. But they also realized that defense and tactics could derail any fighter regardless of strength. After seven years of burning through opponents they finally wrangled a match with the preeminent boxing strategist Floyd Mayweather on Oct. 2013.

Alvarez was 23 years old when they met and was defeated by majority decision. It was an impactful moment for the team from Guadalajara.

“From fighters like Mayweather, we learned a lot. It wasn’t for nothing, he was the best in the ring,” said Eddy Reynoso about that encounter for the WBA and WBC super welterweight world titles in Las Vegas. “Fighting against Mayweather you learn a lot of different levels. The loss teaches you to do better on certain things and you gain a lot of good especially when you fight somebody like that.”

It also sparked an even greater desire to learn the different levels of the sweet science.

After that loss Alvarez seemed to jump to an accelerated level of prizefighting against  opponents of various styles and strengths. When he defeated Puerto Rico’s Miguel Cotto it opened eyes and when he shut out Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. it convinced naysayers that the Mexican redhead and his trainer were capable of defeating any style, and perhaps, moving up in weight.

Reynoso was never in doubt.

Two massive encounters with Gennady Golovkin in 2017 and 2018 proved that Alvarez was more than capable of clashing with the best in the world regardless of weight or experience. And when he demolished super middleweight titlist Rocky Fielding, it further enhanced Canelo’s reputation as a fighter willing to take risks and overcome physical and size advantages.

Last year Reynoso consented to work with sterling prospect Ryan “the Flash” Garcia and world champion Oscar Valdez. Both young fighters watched the development of Alvarez with awe and sought to enhance their own defensive prowess.

Frank Espinoza, who manages undefeated former WBO featherweight titlist Valdez, has witnessed Reynoso in action and marveled at his boxing wisdom.

“What I like is he is a teacher. It makes a difference. He’s not a guy that just holds up the mitts. If you train with him you will become a better fighter,” said Espinoza who has been involved as a boxing manager for several decades. “The way I see it, Jose Reynoso taught Eddy everything since he was a child. He has learned from his father and Eddy has taken over the next generation.”

Espinoza said he’s also visited Reynoso’s boxing library where he has tapes and books on everything concerning boxing.

“Eddy is very knowledgeable in the boxing game. He goes back and we’ll talk about things. He has every Ring Magazine all the way to the 1930s,” said Espinoza, who occasionally visits the small boxing compound in San Diego. “He studies the old trainers like Jorge Rivero and fighters like Miguel Canto. He studies old trainers and old boxing styles, he reads up.”

It’s a trait that Espinoza and others admire.

Studying potential foes and their styles – even those far above the middleweight division — has become a staple of Reynoso. That’s how he discovered former light heavyweight champion Sergey Kovalev during one of his excursions through the boxing landscape.

“When I saw Kovalev in the fight in Frisco, Texas with Eleider Alvarez, it was a good fight and I knew before that Canelo could fight him,” said Reynoso about Canelo moving up to the 175-pound light heavyweight division to contest Kovalev for the WBO light heavyweight world title. “We always knew he had the strength to knock out somebody at light heavyweight. He had done it in sparring. We were sparring a heavyweight and he sent him to the canvas.”

Of course, sparring and fighting in the prize ring are two different obstacles. One who felt it was a bad idea was old friend Willy Silva from Riverside, California.

“I was thinking Canelo was not going to beat Kovalev because he has a good punch,” said Silva, who was reminded of an old 1974 clash between welterweight king Jose “Mantequilla” Napoles and middleweight king Carlos Monzon. In that fight Monzon tore right through Napoles in six rounds. “Monzon was a good puncher like this guy Kovalev. I thought it was going to be the same thing. I wasn’t crazy about it but Canelo did a good job and knocked the guy out.”

It proved to Silva that Reynoso was teaching at a different level.

Espinoza sees it too.

“Eddy has knowledge of the history of boxing. He picks up and learns the boxing of the past. He doesn’t get away from that. He is young but he has that old school mentality,” Espinoza said.

Now Canelo Alvarez reigns as a conqueror of the light heavyweight, super middleweight, middleweight and super welterweight divisions. It’s lofty territory for not only Alvarez but his young professor Eddy Reynoso.

The world awaits their next move but for now, knowledge that he has been named the Trainer of the Year has brought him to an unexpected moment.

“I’m very happy and excited. It fills me with pride and makes me keep going forward and growing as a trainer from Mexico. It personally shows me that we are doing the best things possible,” said Reynoso.

It also proves that the words that shaped his boxing philosophy have rung true – “to be a professor who teaches boxing.”

Congratulations to Eddy Reynoso, this year’s Trainer of the Year.

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The Hauser Report: Garcia-Redkach and More

Thomas Hauser

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Boxing made its debut at Barclays Center on October 20, 2012, with a fight card headlined by four world title bouts. Danny Garcia, Erik Morales, Paulie Malignaggi, Peter Quillin, Devon Alexander, Danny Jacobs, and Luis Collazo were in the ring that night. The franchise grew nicely. Fans who went to Barclays saw good featured fights with solid undercard bouts. But as of late, the arena’s fistic offerings have faded.

Barclays cast its lot with Premier Boxing Champions. And PBC has moved its prime content to greener pastures (green being the color of money). There were five fight cards at Barclays Center in 2019. Each one struggled to sell tickets.

January 25 marked the thirty-ninth fight card at Barclays. The arena was half empty. The announced attendance was 8,217 but that included a lot of freebies. There were six fights on the card. As expected, fighters coming out of the blue corner won all of them. That’s what happens when 6-0 squares off against 2-10-1.

Three of the fights were televised by Showtime Championship Boxing, which has also been diminished as a consequence of a multi-year output deal with PBC.

In the first of these bouts, Stephen Fulton (17-0, 8 KOs) and Ukrainian-born Arnold Khegai (16-0, 10 KOs) met in a junior-featherweight bout. Each had fought the usual suspects en route to their confrontation. There was a lot of holding and rabbit-punching which referee Steve Willis ignored. Eventually, Fulton pulled away for a unanimous-decision triumph.

Next up, Jarrett Hurd (23-1, 16 KOs) took on Francisco Santana (25-7, 12 KOs).

Hurd is a big junior-middleweight who held the WBA and IBF 154-pound titles until losing to Julian Williams last year. Santana is a career welterweight who had lost three of his most recent four fights and had won only three times in the last five years.

Hurd was expected to walk through Santana. But he was strangely passive for much of the fight, which led to the strange spectacle of Santana (the noticeably smaller, lighter-punching man) walking Jarrett down for long stretches of time. Francisco is a one-dimensional fighter and was there to be hit. When Jarrett let his hands go, he hit him. But he fought like a man who didn’t want to fight and didn’t let his hands go often enough.

By round seven, the boos and jeers were raining down. Hurd won a unanimous decision but looked mediocre. That’s the most honest way to put it. One wonders what tricks losing to Julian Williams last year played with his mind.

Also, it should be noted that, when the winning fighter thanks God in a post-fight interview and the crowd (which supported Jarrett at the start of the bout) boos at the mention of The Almighty, there’s a problem.

“The crowd didn’t love it,” Hurd acknowledged afterward. “But you gotta understand; I got the unanimous decision and I did what I wanted to do.”

The main event matched Danny Garcia (35-2, 21 KOs) against Ivan Redkach (23-4-1, 18 KOs).

Garcia had a nice run early in his career, winning belts at 140 and 147 pounds. But later, he came out on the losing end of decisions against Keith Thurman and Shawn Porter. Other than that, he has gone in soft for the past five years.

Redkach is a junior-welterweight who had won 5 of 10 fights during the same five-year time frame.

There was the usual pre-fight nonsense with Garcia telling reporters, “We picked Redkach because he’s dangerous and we knew he’d be tough.” But in truth, Redkach had been whitewashed by Tevin Farmer at 135 pounds and was knocked out at the same weight by John Molina Jr (who never won again).

Garcia, like Hurd, was a 30-to-1 betting favorite.

Redkach fought a safety-first fight. Also, safety second and third. There wasn’t one second when it looked as though he had a realistic chance of winning the fight or fought like he did.

One of the few proactive things that Ivan did do was stick out his tongue from time to time when Garcia hit him. Then, at the end of round eight, he bit Danny on the shoulder while they were in a clinch. At that point, one might have expected referee Benjy Esteves to disqualify Redkach. But Esteves seemed to not notice.

Rather than go for the kill after the bite, Garcia eased up and cruised to a unanimous decision. Meanwhile, by round eleven, the crowd was streaming for the exits. Most of the fans were gone by the time the decision was announced.

Garcia and Hurd had set-up showcase fights scheduled for them. And neither man delivered the way he should have.

Meanwhile, a final thought . . . Sunday, January 26, would have been Harold Lederman’s eightieth birthday.

Harold was the quintessential boxing fan and loved the sport more than anyone I’ve known. He never missed a fight at Barclays Center unless his health prevented him from coming or he was on the road for HBO. He died eight months ago.

As Saturday night’s fight card unfolded, I imagined Harold sitting beside me. He would have had a kind word for everyone who came over to say hello and loved every minute of it. Harold Lederman at the fights was a happy man.

Photo credit: Amanda Westcott

Thomas Hauser’s email address is thomashauserwriter@gmail.com. His most recent book — A Dangerous Journey: Another Year Inside Boxing — was published by the University of Arkansas Press. In 2004, the Boxing Writers Association of America honored Hauser with the Nat Fleischer Award for career excellence in boxing journalism. On June 14, 2020, he will be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame.

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Fast Results from Brooklyn: No Surprises as Garcia and Hurd Win Lopsidedly

Arne K. Lang

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Tonight, Philadelphia’s Danny Garcia made his eighth appearance at Barclays Center. Garcia’s 2017 fight with Keith Thurman drew 16,533, the attendance high for a boxing show at the arena. A far smaller crowd was in attendance tonight to see Garcia take on Ivan Redkach in a non-title fight slated for 12 rounds.

Redkach, a 33-year-old LA-based Ukrainian, is a southpaw. That’s no coincidence. Garcia hopes to land big-money fights with Errol Spence and/or Manny Pacquiao, both southpaws.

Redkach (23-4-1 coming in) turned his career around in his last fight with a career-best performance, a sixth-round stoppage of former two-division title-holder Devon Alexander, a 15-year pro who hadn’t previously been stopped. But there was a class difference between he and Danny Garcia, a former WBA and WBC 140-pound world title-holder and former WBC 147-pound champion.

Garcia (35-2, 21 KOs) was simply sharper. His workrate slowed late in the fight, allowing the game Redkach to steal a few rounds, but at the final gun he was relatively unmarked whereas Redkach was conspicuously bruised. The scores were 118-110 and 117-111 twice. The crowd booed at intervals, understandable as they were subject to a drab 6-fight card that was even less interesting than it was on paper.

Co-Feature

In the 10-round co-feature, Jarrett Hurd, making his first start since losing his WBA/IBF super welterweight title to Julian Williams last May, went on cruise control from the opening bell and jabbed his way to a lopsided 10-round decision over Francisco Santana. Hurd, who improved to 24-1, finally let loose late in the 10th frame, putting Santana (25-8-1) on the canvas with a succession of left hooks, but by then many in the crowd had probably nodded off.

This was Hurd’s first fight with new trainer Kay Koroma who has drawn raves for his work with America’s elite amateurs. The scores were 97-92 and 99-90 twice. SoCal’s Santana has now lost five of his last eight.

The opening bout on the main TV portion of the card was a 12-round super bantamweight contest between Philadelphia’s Stephen Fulton and fellow unbeaten Arnold Khegai who currently trains in Philadelphia.

Fulton (18-0, 8 KOs) simply had too much class for Khegai (16-1-1), a Ukrainian of Korean heritage. Although Khegai frequently backed Fulton into the ropes, the Philadelphian had an air-tight defense and connected with many more punches. The fight went the full 12 with Fulton prevailing by scores of 116-112 and 117-111 twice.

If the WBO has its way, Fulton will proceed to a fight with Emanuel Navarrete, but don’t hold your breath as Navarrete is promoted by Bob Arum who undoubtedly wants to extract more mileage from him before letting him risk his belt against a crafty fighter like Stephen Fulton.

Photo credit: Amanda Westcott / SHOWTIME

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Sacramento Honors Diego ‘Chico’ Corrales

Arne K. Lang

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Tonight (Saturday, Jan. 25) former two-division world boxing champion Diego “Chico” Corrales will be posthumously inducted into the Sacramento Sports Hall of Fame at the organization’s eighth annual induction ceremony at the Thunder Valley Casino Resort.

Corrales, who grew up in Sacramento, the son of a Columbian father and a Mexican mother, turned pro at age 18 and went on to compile a record of 40-5 (33 KOs). He won his first title in 1999 with a seventh-round stoppage of previously undefeated Robert Garcia. Now recognized as one of boxing’s top trainers, Garcia was making the fourth defense of his IBF 130-pound title.

Five years later, Corrales won the WBO world lightweight title with a 10th-round stoppage of Brazil’s previously undefeated Acelino Freitas. That set up a unification fight with the WBC belt-holder Jose Luis Castillo.

Corrales and Castillo met on May 7, 2005, at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas. To say they put on a great fight would be an understatement. The boxing writers in attendance will tell you that this was the greatest fight of all time. It was named Fight of the Decade by The Ring magazine.

The final round, the 10th, was unbelievable. Heading into the round, Corrales was ahead on two of the three scorecards, but his left eye was swollen nearly shut and during the round he was knocked down twice. No one would have faulted referee Tony Weeks for stopping the fight after the second knockdown. But, somehow, Corrales was able to rally, pulling the fight out of the fire with a barrage of punches that had Castillo out on his feet when Weeks waived it off.

Two years to the very day of this iconic fight, Diego “Chico” Corrales died in a motorcycle accident in his adopted hometown of Las Vegas when he rear-ended a car while traveling at a high rate of speed. He was 29 years old.

Corrales was a thrill-seeker. In a 2006 profile, Las Vegas Review-Journal boxing writer Kevin Iole enumerated these among Castillo’s hobbies: jumping out of planes from 14,000 feet, bungee jumping from 400 feet, snowboarding in treacherous terrain and scuba diving amid a school of sharks. “He lived his life the same way he fought,” said his promoter Gary Shaw, “with reckless abandon.”

It might seem odd that it took so long for Corrales to be recognized by the Sacramento Sports Hall of Fame, but there was a period when Corrales’s name was mud in his hometown and perhaps the organization’s founder, Las Vegas sports radio personality T.C. Martin, a Sacramento native, thought it appropriate to let old wounds heal.

In 2001, shortly after suffering his first pro loss at the hands of Floyd Mayweather, Corrales pled guilty to felony domestic violence in the beating of his first wife and would serve 14 months in prison. “The whole family has worn a black eye for it,” Diego’s brother Esteban Corrales told Sacramento Bee reporter Marcos Bretan.

For all his recklessness, the incident didn’t jibe with his persona. In the company of Las Vegas sportswriters, the soft-spoken and well-spoken Corrales came across as polite and humble.

Corrales, one of five inductees in the 2020 class, joins three other boxers already installed in the Sacramento Hall: Pete Ranzany, Loreto Garza, and Tony “Tiger” Lopez.

Ranzany, a welterweight, fought four former or future world champions and was a fixture in Sacramento rings in the late 1970’s. Garza wrested the WBA super lightweight title from Argentina’s Juan Martin Coggi in France and successfully defended the belt here in Sacramento with a one-sided conquest of Vinny Pazienza. Lopez, Sacramento’s most popular fighter ever, made the turnstiles hum at the city’s largest arena where he fought eight of his 14 world title fights beginning with his 1988 humdinger with defending IBF 130-pound champion Rocky Lockridge.

Among the speakers at tonight’s confab will be Kenny Adams. Perhaps best known as the head trainer for the 1988 U.S. Olympic team that won eight medals in Seoul, Adams currently trains Nonito Donaire. He was with Diego Corrales for 24 fights, during which Corrales was 23-1, avenging the lone defeat by Joel Casamayor. Festivities start at 7 pm.

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