Connect with us

Featured Articles

3 Punch Combo: Two Fighters on the Fast Track, a Blue-Chip Prospect and More

Published

on

3-Punch-Combo-Two-Fighters-in-the-Fast-Track-a-Blue-Chip-Prospect-and-More

3 Punch Combo: Two Fighters on the Fast Track, a Blue-Chip Prospect and More

THREE PUNCH COMBO – Given the plethora of boxing available on a weekly basis on various platforms, it can be easy to overlook some events. For example, this past Saturday there was a stacked card in Ekaterinburg, Russia featuring several up-and-coming fighters. One fighter in particular, cruiserweight Evgeny Tishchenko, piqued my interest.

Tishchenko, 28, won the Gold medal in the heavyweight division for Russia in the 2016 Summer Olympics. He turned pro as a heavyweight in 2018 but has since moved down to cruiserweight.

Tishchenko entered the fight with a record of 6-0 with 4 knockouts. His opponent was veteran Marcos Antonio Aumada who entered with a record of 21-8. Aumada was actually a big step down in class for Tishchenko. Tishchenko’s previous four opponents had a combined record of 64-4-1 and he was coming off an impressive knockout win of then 20-0 Issa Akberbayev in November.

Not surprisingly, Tishchenko (pictured) made easy work of Aumada, stopping him in the third round of their scheduled ten round fight.

While the result was expected, I continue to be impressed with what I see from Tishchenko. Aumada kept a tight guard, but Tishchenko used excellent footwork setting up just the right angles to find ways to penetrate it. Tishchenko, who fights as a southpaw, also showcased a sharp right jab which created openings to land the straight left behind it.

In addition to the above, Tishchenko is an excellent counterpuncher. He put his counterpunching skills on display early in the third round with a quick sneaky check right hook that landed pinpoint on the chin of Aumada, knocking him down. Finally, the punching power is certainly for real as is the finishing ability. Once he had Aumada on the canvas, Tishchenko went to work, hurting Aumada several more times before landing a series of crunching body shots that brought the fight to an end.

With the exit of Oleksandr Usyk, cruiserweight is a wide-open division. Tishchenko is on the fast track and could soon ascend to the top of the division.

Eimantas Stanionis

FS1 will broadcast a card this Saturday from MGM National Harbor in Oxon Hill, MD that will be headlined by popular action fighter James Kirkland (34-2, 30 KO’s) who will take on Marcos Hernandez (14-3-1, 3 KO’s) in a scheduled ten round middleweight bout. While I will admit that I am curious to see how Kirkland fares in this contest, it is the scheduled ten round welterweight co-main event between Eimantas Stanionis (10-0, 7 KO’s) and Justin DeLoach (18-4, 9 KO’s) that really has my interest.

A highly decorated amateur, Stanionis, 25, represented Lithuania in the 2016 Summer Olympics. He turned pro in 2017 and has been on the fast track toward a world title shot.

In just his seventh pro fight in August of 2018, Stanionis put on an impressive performance in winning a lopsided eight round decision against veteran contender Levan Ghvamichava. That victory moved Stanionis from prospect to contender and in 2019 he continued his rise by going 3-0 with 2 knockouts.

Stanionis is a pressure fighter by trade. From his amateur days, he has developed a precision left jab that he will use to get within his opposition’s range. Once inside, Stanionis will use subtle footwork to shift around his opponents enabling him to land precision combinations. And as his record indicates, those combinations carry some power behind them.

An aspect of Stanionis’s game that I like is that he is relentless with his pressure and punching volume. He is constantly on the front foot attempting to overwhelm his opponent. But on the flip side, this can lead to some defensive flaws. In particular, Stanionis can leave himself wide open to be countered by a sharp puncher. And DeLoach just happens to be a sharp counterpuncher.

DeLoach, 26, was himself a highly touted prospect. During one stretch between 2016 and 2017, DeLoach strung off four straight wins against opponents with a combined record of 57-1-1.

However, since that stretch his career has hit a stumbling block; he’s dropped three of his last four. Now he finds his career at a crossroads and needs a win to avoid falling into that dreaded journeyman category.

DeLoach is a natural boxer-puncher by trade. He is athletic and possesses good hand speed. While he can work combinations behind the left jab, DeLoach has often been most effective as a counterpuncher.

The skill set for DeLoach is quite impressive but he has struggled against pressure fighters. Inside fighting is not his strength and his chin has abandoned him at times. Against Stanionis, DeLoach will need to keep the fight at range in order to remain competitive.

DeLoach is clearly a step up for the fast rising Stanionis and has a style that could cause Stanionis some issues. I think DeLoach will have his spots even if he eventually wilts to the pressure of Stanionis. I am always up for a fun action fight that features a nice contrast of styles and that is what I think we will see when these two meet on Saturday.

Brandun Lee

Boxing on Showtime returns with yet another installment of the popular ShoBox series this Friday from the Grand Casino in Hinckley, MN. The quadruple header features eight fighters with a combined record of 54-4-2. While I am looking forward to all four contests, I am most excited to see the main event where 140-pound prospect Brandun Lee (18-0, 16 KO’s) takes a step up in class in facing Camilo Prieto (15-2, 9 KO’s).

Lee, 20, earned numerous accolades in the US amateur program before turning pro in January of 2017. He has stayed quite active as a pro and has scored some highlight reel knockouts. There is definitely quite a bit of buzz about Lee in boxing circles and his apparent immense potential in this sport.

On the surface, Lee appears to have all the tools. He is very fluid in both how he moves around the ring and how he throws his punches. The left jab, which he often works behind, is both sharp and accurate. And his right hand carries some serious power. In his ShoBox debut last September, Lee used that jab-right-hand combination to score a scintillating knockout of Milton Arauz.

The biggest knock on Lee so far in his career has been his level of competition. Arauz was the 17th opponent Lee had faced and the first who entered the ring with a winning record. So, while the performances have looked great and Lee has taken care of business, the jury is still out as he has yet to be remotely challenged.

The best thing that can be said about Lee’s opponent Prieto is that he does have a winning record. This is not saying a lot but Prieto has a better resume than that of Arauz so that alone qualifies Prieto as a step up for Lee.

There is limited video available on Prieto but from what I can see he likes to move around the ring while flicking his left jab out. In spots he will rush in and look to fire off some combinations. And he does generally keep a very tight guard with good head movement. I know this is not a ringing endorsement, but he should be more of a live body than any of the previous opponents that Lee has faced.

This will be Lee’s first fight headlining a major televised card and I am very interested to see how he performs. It could be the start to a breakout campaign in 2020.

Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel 

To comment on this story in The Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Featured Articles

The Inevitable Triple Crown of Emanuel Navarrete: Demystifying Alphabet Titles

Published

on

The-Inevitable-Triple-Crown-of-Emanuel Navarrete-Demystifying-Alphabet-Titles

The Inevitable Triple Crown of Emanuel Navarrete: Demystifying Alphabet Titles

The thing which most needs to be understood concerning alphabet sanctioning bodies and the fighters who wear their belts is that the relationship is primarily one of customer and supplier.  Fighters pay to wear the alphabet belts that so profligate in the sport of boxing and they are in receipt of a service.  The service is twofold. Firstly, they are supplied with hardware. Belts for the “WBO Asia Pacific” middleweight title holder. Belts for the “World Boxing Council Silver flyweight title holder. Belts for the “World Boxing Association International” cruiserweight title holder. Belts for everyone.

Depending upon who you feel like recognising there can be around a thousand title belts floating around the world of boxing at any given time and the great percentage of these are not “world titles” but regional titles, pre-title titles (you read that right) and completely made-up titles for special occasions. Whenever you see a title, someone is paying a portion of their fight fee to the relevant sanctioning body. This is why fringe companies like the WBF and IBO spring into existence – where there is a belt there is cash.

This brings us to the second function served by the thousand belts sucking money out of boxing: they do make financial sense for the fighters and are directly profitable in the case of “world” titles.  Take the case of Padraig McCrory (16-0) out of Belfast.  He is a fine 175lb prospect with good power he has not yet quite harnessed into a fulsome skillset fighting just below national title level often on Michael Conlan undercards.  He’s also the light-heavyweight champion of the world according to the IBO, who crowned him for defeating Lean Bunn, a German who had never contested a fight longer than eight rounds before. He folded to McCrory in six.

Now McCrory can put “world light-heavyweight champion” on his fight-posters. For those that consider the IBO a body of minor reputation, that is fair, but boxing should not kid itself that IBO means more to most members of the paying public than WBA does – and nor should it, in this writer’s opinion. They are all in the same business and if it seems the fighter makes the title, keep in mind that Oleksandr Usyk wears an IBO heavyweight crown and Gennady Golovkin an IBO middleweight strap.

I was interested to see then that Emanuel Navarrete was set to step up to his third weight class and box for a “title” in the shape of the WBO 130lb world championship. The reigning 126lb WBO title holder, Navarrete is a fine example of a modern-day boxing customer to the bodies who are meant to police them. He has been paying the WBO for years.

I have to say here that there is no implication that Navarrete has done anything illegal nor even anything morally wrong within the culture of the industry he inhabits. Everyone pays sanctioning fees. Anthony Joshua, who is boxing’s second biggest earner since Floyd Mayweather’s retirement, is rumoured to have sunk well over a million dollars into sanctioning fees. Generally, champions and challengers will pay 2-3% of their fight purse to a roof of around $250,000 depending upon which ABC they are working with; some alphabets charge a registration fee to promoters, also. This means that for the likes of Joshua, Canelo Alvarez, and Floyd Mayweather the sanctioning fees can become quite prohibitive. Mayweather himself dropped belts to avoid paying these monies. The wonderful Erik Morales at one point completely ceased co-operating with his suppliers.

But generally, fighters do as Navarrete does and they pay for the gold. The proliferation of minor regional titles I describe in paragraph one was something that Navarrete neatly sidestepped. That is because he was very much the opponent for his 2018 fight with Isaac Dogboe, who had paid for regional title belts since 2015 at one point somehow being named both the WBO “African Featherweight” champion and the WBO “Oriental Featherweight” champion. Dogboe is British but was born in Ghana. Paying for these titles got him onto the WBO on-ramp, establishing him as a customer of this organisation and allowing relationships to be built between the WBO and Dogboe’s promotional organisation – again, if this sounds like a form of corruption, it should be noted that this is normal, no accusations of legal wrongdoing are being made.

When Dogboe surprisingly dropped his 122lb title to Navarrete, the WBO had a new customer – and a good one. Navarrete boxes in America and on American television, which is still the best way to enhance a purse without a pay-per-view audience. His most recent paydays are estimated at around a million dollars. This meant that when Navarrete decided that he could no longer make 122lbs, the WBO had a problem, namely that it was losing money on Navarrete’s purses as he no longer held a WBO strap. Navarrete also had a problem – he couldn’t leverage television or the paying public with a “world championship.” So, after boxing a fighter named Uriel Lopez Juarez who had lost his last three fights, Navarrete was deemed for a title shot at 126lbs, against another WBO customer, Ruben Villa, who had been paying to wield a regional WBO strap for the past year.

Villa was in no way qualified to face Navarrete. There is absolutely no question of the WBO fixing fights, but there they mandated a contest that would have genuinely shocked had it produced a Navarrete loss. This type of match-making is as old as the sport, where lesser fighters are sacrificed at the alters of the sport’s cash cows to fatten their records and progress their careers: but it is not, until recently, that this became normal for sanctioned “world title” fights.

Villa had never boxed over twelve rounds before in his career. Although he was clearly able to defend himself, Villa was dumped twice by Navarrete who won a clear points decision win. What we saw this Friday night in Glendale was a repeat of this exercise as Navarrete, once more struggling with the weight limit in his new division, departed for pastures new and 130lbs. The soft opponent this time would be Liam Wilson, an Australian, like Villa before him a loyal WBO customer having wielded both their “WBO Asia Pacific” 130lb title and their “WBO International” 130lb title in his short career (now 11-2). This is the first piece of the alphabet puzzle when trying to decipher who the most valued customers of an alphabet organisation are: is the championship match against a soft opponent who is expected to lose?

Look closer though, and you can sometimes see more.

Liam Wilson was astonished at the weigh-in when he was announced at just over 126lbs, nearly four pounds below the divisional weight-limit.

“Something happened with the scales,” he told Australian media.  “I’m sure they’ve been tampered with. I weighed in 20 minutes prior to the weigh in. I was just under weight. I went on the official scales for the official weigh-in and I was four pounds under, magically. So, in twenty minutes I lost four pounds, two kilos in Australian weight.”

Fighters sometimes sit in saunas forgoing water and sweating the best part of themselves into a tightly wrapped arrangement of plastic to lose this sort of weight. It is an enormous difference for Wilson, a man who has not weighed in close to 126lbs since the Oceanian Youth & Junior Championship – in 2012.

“I think he’s come in overweight and they tampered with the scales to make it seem like he made it.”

This is a significant accusation, and one that has not been proven. From the WBO’s own regulations:

The President of the Organization shall attend or designate a WBO Supervisor to attend every World Championship contest sanctioned by the WBO. The duties of said Supervisor shall be to represent the WBO at the Championship Match and prefight events including the weigh in…if a World Champion fails to make the prescribed weight for his category, the Champion shall lose the title at the scales, and the Championship shall then and there be declared vacant, whether or not the challenger makes weight.

The WBO then, is responsible for making sure the weigh in is conducted fairly to both parties.  Currently, there is no evidence that this was not the case.

Happily, the fight itself was a good one and a competitive affair before Navarrete lifted the vacant strap by technical knockout in the ninth. Navarrete, with limited experience of the 130lb punch was caught with a flush left hook in the fourth which Wilson followed up with good pressure and punching to ditch his man. Navarrete had the experience to spit the gumshield out while receiving a standing eight, clearly in trouble; Wilson did not have the experience to follow up against a hurt Navarrete who had bought himself some extra time.

That is why good customers tend to get inexperienced opponents when fighting for a favoured organisation’s strap. Imagine Shavkatdzhon Rakhimov or Roger Gutierrez chasing a hurt Navarrete across the ring in what, after all, is supposed to be a world-title fight. That is the key. There was nothing wrong with making Navarrete-Wilson; it was a good fight conducted in what were difficult circumstances for the Australian and one he nearly won, but for a world-title to be perpetrated upon the boxing public at the end of it is unreasonable.

It is also inevitable. As soon as the people who are policing the fighters become a service industry for those fighters, the type of easy night we repeatedly see for WBO favourites becomes nothing less than a part of the fabric of the sport. Even so, a fighter becoming a triple-crown champion by defeating not one but two fighters who have never boxed the championship distance seems shocking, even for this sport.

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Rey Vargas: “The featherweight title is absolutely still mine”

Published

on

Rey-Vargas-The-Featherweight-Title-is-Absolutely-Still-Mine

Although there have been many speculations and comments about his boxing future, Mexican Rey Vargas affirms with total conviction that he will only decide after his fight against American O’Shaquie Foster on February 11th at the Alamodome in Texas.

Undefeated and current WBC featherweight champion, Vargas (36-0, 22 KOs) will seek to add the vacant WBC super featherweight belt that American southpaw Shakur Stevenson (19-0, 9 KOs) lost on the scale last September when he beat Brazilian Robson Conceicao (17-2, 8 KOs) by unanimous decision.

Referring to his 126-pound title, Vargas expressed via a translator, “The featherweight title is absolutely still mine, so no worries about that. As far as 130, this is definitely an interesting challenge, an interesting place to be. We haven’t really decided what we’re gonna do afterwards, but we’re focused on the moment right now. Let’s focus on this fight, on this great crowd that we’re gonna be in front of, and then whatever happens, it will come after this fight.”

Born 32 years ago in the Federal District and residing in Otumba, Mexico, Vargas captured the world featherweight belt in February 2017, defeating Gavin McDonnell (22-2-3, 6 KOs) by majority decision at the Ice Arena in McDonnell’s hometown of Hull, England.

During the following two years, he made five successful defenses and in November 2021 he was victorious in a 10-round bout against his compatriot Leonardo Báez (21-5, 12 KOs) at the MGM Grand, Las Vegas.

Eight months later, in his second appearance at 126 pounds, Vargas defeated then-undefeated Philippine champion Mark Magsayo (24-1, 16 KOs) by split decision. Magsayo was defending his WBC belt for the first time that night at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas.

After beating Magsayo, Vargas’s representatives made arrangements to collide with Mexican Leo Santa Cruz (38-2-1, 19 KOs), who at that time was the WBA featherweight super champion.

However, the agreement with Santa Cruz did not materialize and Vargas directed his attention towards the 130-pound belt, which Stevenson lost at the weigh-in in September. Considering his status as champion, the WBC agreed to Vargas’ request and ordered him to compete with O’Foster, who is ranked at the top of the category.

In a statement on its website, the WBC specified that the winner between Vargas and Foster has the obligation to make two defenses, according to the rules and regulations of that sanctioning body.

“The Leo Santa Cruz fight is definitely something that we have been meaning to do for years now,” Vargas said. “But as the process got more complicated and other stuff just kept getting in our way, this door opened for us where it was definitely an interesting challenge, something that can be as good as the Leo Santa Cruz fight.”

“(I’m) in a new division, the super featherweight division, where I can test myself,” said Vargas. Yes, it’s not my division per se, but I’m always up to new and exciting challenges, and this is definitely one of them. So, even though this isn’t the Leo Santa Cruz fight, it can definitely live up to the hype just as that one would.”

Foster (19-2, 11 KOs) has nine successive wins, the most recent against Tajikistan southpaw Muhammadkhuja Yakubon on March 18 of last year in Dubai, where they fought for the WBC silver belt.

Born 29 years ago in Orange, Texas, Foster said in an interview that this opportunity to face Vargas for the 130-pound crown “is a dream come true. And I’m so happy I can’t even hide it.”

Foster continued, “It’s something that I’ve been working for since I was eight years old. I never had a dream to be an Olympian, it was always to be a world champion so I’m feeling great and I’m ready to put on a show for the world.

“I feel like everything is happening at the right time and it’s my time to take over. I would love to unify once I get the title and then go undisputed if I can.  I’ve got big, big, big aspirations coming up.  We’re going to make it happen.”

Article submitted by Jorge Juan Álvarez in Spanish.

Please note any adjustments made were for clarification purposes and any errors in translation were unintentional.

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

 

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Navarrete Overcomes Adversity to TKO Wilson in a Corker

Published

on

Navarrete-Overcomes-Adversity-to-TKO-Wilson-in-a-Corker

Mexico’s Emanuel Navarrete won his 31st straight fight, pushing his record to 37-1 (31) and captured a title in a third weight class tonight at the Desert Diamond Arena in Phoenix, Arizona, but nearly came a cropper himself in a match in which both he and his opponent Liam Wilson were on the deck and hurt on multiple occasions. At stake was the WBO 130-pound belt vacated by Shakur Stevenson.

The obscure 26-year-old Wilson, subbing for Oscar Valdez who had to pull out with a rib injury, was making his U.S. debut and appearing in his first scheduled 12-rounder. The skinny on him was that he had a puncher’s chance because of a powerful left hook, but with only 12 pro fights on his ledger he was a massive underdog.

Navarrete got a taste of that left hook in the fourth round which Wilson landed after landing a hard overhand right, and suddenly it appeared that the Queenslander was poised to score the biggest upset in Australian boxing history since Jeff Horn upended Manny Pacquiao. Navarrete hit the deck, lost his mouthpiece and was clearly hurt, but managed to survive the round after precious seconds elapsed as he was getting his mouthpiece re-fitted.

Navarrete fought his way back into the fight and was having a strong sixth round until the final 30 seconds when Wilson hurt him again, this time with a right hook. But the Mexican weathered the storm, winning the next two rounds decisively and closed the show in round nine when he put the intrepid Aussie on the deck with an overhand right, the prelude to an assault that forced the referee to waive it off.

Semi-windup

In a tactical junior welterweight fight that heated up in the final round, LA’s Arnold Barboza continued his steady ascent toward a title fight with a narrow but unanimous decision over Puerto Rican veteran Jose Pedraza, a former Olympian and world title-holder in two weight divisions.

Barboza, who fights well off his back foot but isn’t a hard puncher, won by scores of 97-93 and 96-94 twice to push his record to 28-0. The 33-year-old Barboza fell to 29-5-1.

Also

In the opening bout on ESPN’s main platform, Tulare, California’s Richard Torrez Jr, a silver medalist at the Tokyo Summer Games, scored his fifth fast knockout in as many opportunities at the expense late sub James Bryant

Torrez came out like gangbusters, as is his custom, and sent Bryant stumbling back into the ropes with a harsh left uppercut followed by a straight hand in the waning seconds of the opening round. A highly decorated high school football player in Pennsylvania who had a cup of coffee with two NFL teams, Bryant, 37, was saved by the bell but elected not to come out for round two.

Torrez has mentioned that he would welcome a fight with British up-and-comer Frazer Clarke. Both were defeated in the Tokyo Olympics by fearsome Uzbek southpaw Bakhodir Jalolov, the heavy favorite.

ESPN+

Las Vegas super featherweight Andres Cortes (19-0) overcame a deep cut on his left eyelid to keep his undefeated record intact with a lopsided decision over Luis Melendez. The cut was caused by an accidental clash of heads in round six. Cut man deluxe “Stitch” Duran used his magic potion to stem the bleeding and the match continued on its established course. Cortes, the busier fighter, won all 10 rounds on all three cards. Melendez, a Puerto Rican from Hialeah, Florida, declined to 17-3.

Nico Ali Walsh, Muhammad Ali’s grandson, advanced to 8-0 (5) with a unanimous decision over a local fighter, Eduardo Ayala (9-3-1), in a six-round middleweight affair. The scores were 60-53 and 59-54 twice.

Walsh, who sparred with Caleb Plant in preparation for this fight, had Ayala on the canvas in round two, compliments of a short right hand, but his durable opponent managed to last the distance.

In an 8-round junior welterweight match, Mexico’s Lindolfo Delgado, a 2016 Rio Olympian, advanced to 17-0 (13) with a unanimous decision over Clarence Booth (21-7), a 35-year-old Floridian. The scores were 80-71 and 79-72 twice.

The heavy-handed Delgado, who had Robert Garcia in his corner, scored the fight’s lone knockdown, knocking Booth off his pins in the final stanza with a chopping right hand to the ear.

In the ESPN+ opener, 18-year-old Emiliano Vargas (3-0, 2 KOs) won a 4-round unanimous decision over 19-year-old Tex-Mex southpaw Francisco Duque (1-2). Vargas won all four rounds, but Duque had several good moments.

Emiliano Vargas is the youngest and most well-touted of three fighting sons of Fernando Vargas, the former U.S. Olympian and two-time world super welterweight champion.

A 10-round super featherweight fight between Zavier Martinez (18-1) and Yohan Vasquez (25-3) was cancelled when it became obvious that Martinez would not make the contracted weight.

Photo credit: Mikey Williams / Top Rank via Getty Images

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Boxing-Odds-and-Ends-A-New-Foe-for-Broner-and-an-Intriguing-Heavyweight-Matchup
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Boxing Odds and Ends: A New Foe for Broner and an Intriguing Heavyweight Match-up

Jermaine-Wallin-and-Otto-Wallin-Losing-Can-Be-Winning-or-Not
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Jermaine Franklin and Otto Wallin; Losing Can Be Winning, or Not

Artur-Beterbiev-I'd-prefer-to-fight-Bivol-because-he-has-the-one-thing-I-need
Featured Articles1 week ago

Artur Beterbiev: “I’d prefer to fight Bivol because he has the one thing I need”

A-Shocker-in-Manchester-Liam-Smith-Stops-Chris-Eubank-Jr-in-Four
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

A Shocker in Manchester: Liam Smith Stops Chris Eubank Jr in Four

Anthony-Yarde-I-am-at-my-bst-when-I-fight-fire-with-fire
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Anthony Yarde: “I am at my best when I fight fire with fire.”

Saul-Rodriguez-Showcased-in-Garcia-Promotions-Event.jpg
Featured Articles6 days ago

Garcia Promotions’ Event in San Bernardino was a Showcase for Saul Rodriguez

Swamp-King-Jonathan-Guidry-Vanquishes-Bermane-Stiverne-in-Miami
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

‘Swamp King’ Jonathan Guidry Vanquishes Bermane Stiverne in Miami

R.I.P.-Former-Heavyweight-Champ-Gerrie Coetsee-aa-South-African-Sporting-Icon
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

R.I.P. Former Heavyweight Champ Gerrie Coetzee, a South African Sporting Icon

Tank-Davis-TKOs-Garcia-Boots-Ennis-Shuts-Out-Chukhadzhian
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Tank Davis TKOs Garcia; Boots Ennis Shuts Out Chukhadzhian

Guillermo-Rigondeaux-Refuses-to-Hang-Up-His-Gloves
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Guillermo Rigondeaux Refuses to Hang Up His Gloves

Boxing-Odds-and-Ends-Roiman-Villa's-Remarkable-Rally-and-More
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Boxing Odds and Ends: Roiman Villa’s Remarkable Rally and More

The-Greatest-Boxing-Book-Never-Written-and-More-Literary-Notes
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

The Greatest Boxing Book Never Written and More Literary Notes

Naoya-Inoue-Puts-the-Super-Bantamweight-Division-on-High-Alert
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Naoya Inoue Puts the Super Bantamweight Division on High Alert

Avila-Perspective-Chap-219-Tank-and-Company
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 219: Tank Davis and Company

David-Dynamite-Stevens-KOs-Sean-Hemphill-on-ShoBox
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

David “Dynamite” Stevens KOs Sean Hemphill on ShoBox

Adrien-Broner-has-a-bew-Opponent-Ivan-Redkach-is-Out-Hank-Lundy-is-In
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Adrien Broner has a New Opponent: Ivan Redkach is Out; Hank Lundy is In

Jaron-Boots-Ennis-A-Pure-Fighter-on-the-Cusp-of-Breakout-Year
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Jaron ‘Boots’ Ennis – A Pure Fighter on the Cusp of a Breakout Year

Romain-Villa-Storms-Back-in-the-Final-Frame-to-Upset-Rashidi-Ellis-on-Showtime
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Roiman Villa Storms Back in the Final Frame to Upset Rashidi Ellis on Showtime

Devin-Haney-vs-Vasily-Lomachenko-A-High-Stakes-Duel
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Devin Haney vs Vasily Lomachenko: A High Stakes Duel

Andy-Ruiz-and-Filip-Hrgovic-on-the-Road-toOleksandr-Usyk
Featured Articles5 days ago

Andy Ruiz and Filip Hrgovic on the Road to Oleksandr Usyk

The-Inevitable-Triple-Crown-of-Emanuel Navarrete-Demystifying-Alphabet-Titles
Featured Articles53 mins ago

The Inevitable Triple Crown of Emanuel Navarrete: Demystifying Alphabet Titles

Rey-Vargas-The-Featherweight-Title-is-Absolutely-Still-Mine
Featured Articles4 hours ago

Rey Vargas: “The featherweight title is absolutely still mine”

Navarrete-Overcomes-Adversity-to-TKO-Wilson-in-a-Corker
Featured Articles16 hours ago

Navarrete Overcomes Adversity to TKO Wilson in a Corker

Avila-Perspective-Chap-223-Am-Act-of-War-Benavidez-vs-Plant-Press-Confab
Featured Articles20 hours ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 223: An Act of War Benavidez vs Plant Press Confab

Bazinyan--Improves-to-29-0-but Gollaz-and-Gaumont-Steal-the-Show-in-Montreal
Featured Articles2 days ago

Bazinyan Improves to 29-0, but Gollaz and Gaumont Steal the Show in Montreal

Alycia-Maumgardner-vs-Elhem-Mekhaled-Amanda-serrano-Erika-Cruz-Choi Hyun Mi-Mikaela-Mayer-Delfine-Persoon
Featured Articles2 days ago

Alycia Baumgardner vs Elhem Mekhaled: Female Splendor at MSG 

How-good-is-Jake-Paul-Shane-Mosley's-Answer-May-Surprise-You
Featured Articles2 days ago

How good is Jake Paul? Shane Mosley’s Answer May Surprise You

Amanda-Serrano-Seeks-Undisputed-Status-at-126=with-Katie-Taylor-on-the-Horizon
Featured Articles3 days ago

Amanda Serrano Seeks Undisputed Status at 126 with Katie Taylor on the Horizon 

Beterbiev-Remains-Focused-on-Dmitry-Bivol-after-Knocking-Out-Anthony-Yarde
Featured Articles3 days ago

Beterbiev Remains Focused on Dmitry Bivol after Knocking Out Anthony Yarde

Andy-Ruiz-and-Filip-Hrgovic-on-the-Road-toOleksandr-Usyk
Featured Articles5 days ago

Andy Ruiz and Filip Hrgovic on the Road to Oleksandr Usyk

Artem-Dalakian-Sunny-Edwards-and-the-Most-Storied-Title-in-Boxing
Featured Articles5 days ago

Artem Dalakian, Sunny Edwards, and the Most Storied Title in Boxing

Emanuel-Navarrete-Aims-to-Become-Champion-in--Third-Weight-Class-on-Friday
Featured Articles6 days ago

Emanuel Navarrete Aims to Become Champion in a Third Weight Class on Friday

Saul-Rodriguez-Showcased-in-Garcia-Promotions-Event.jpg
Featured Articles6 days ago

Garcia Promotions’ Event in San Bernardino was a Showcase for Saul Rodriguez

Alexis-Rocha-KOs-Brave-but-Overmatched-George-Ashie-on-DAZN
Featured Articles7 days ago

Alexis Rocha KOs Brave but Overmatched George Ashie on DAZN

Artur-Beterbiev-TKOs-Anthony-Yarde-in-a-London-Firefight
Featured Articles7 days ago

Artur Beterbiev TKOs Anthony Yarde in a London Firefight

Jake-Paul-vs-Tommy-Fury-onFeb-26-in-a-Potential-Pay-Per-View-Blockbuster
Featured Articles1 week ago

Jake Paul vs Tommy Fury on Feb. 26 in a Potential Pay-Per-View Blockbuster

Avila-Perspective-Chap-223-A-Lively-Weeend-in-SoCal-with-Three-Fight-Cards-in-Two-Days
Featured Articles1 week ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 223: A Lively Weekend in SoCal with Three Fight Cards in Two Days

Artur-Beterbiev-I'd-prefer-to-fight-Bivol-because-he-has-the-one-thing-I-need
Featured Articles1 week ago

Artur Beterbiev: “I’d prefer to fight Bivol because he has the one thing I need”

Boxing-Odds-and-Ends-A-New-Foe-for-Broner-and-an-Intriguing-Heavyweight-Matchup
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Boxing Odds and Ends: A New Foe for Broner and an Intriguing Heavyweight Match-up

David-Benavidez-and-Caleb-Plant-Both-Want-Canelo-Alvarez
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

David Benavidez and Caleb Plant Both Want ‘Canelo’ Álvarez

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Advertisement