Connect with us

Featured Articles

Bob Arum Perseveres as Many of His Old Stomping Grounds Bite the Dust

Published

on

Bob-Arum-Perseveres-as-Many-of-His-Old-Stomping-Grounds-Bite-the-Dust

Bob Arum Perseveres as Many of His Old Stomping Grounds Bite the Dust

Someone once said that the only constant in life is change. That goes double for Las Vegas, the city that is constantly re-inventing itself. Casino-resorts seemingly change ownership on a whim, begetting a make-over, and others are imploded to make way for whatever is next.

Top Rank honcho Bob Arum has seen it all in the four-plus decades he has been making waves in Sin City. He has out-lived so many Las Vegas casinos that we have lost count.

It was learned last week that three more Las Vegas hotel-casinos are headed to the scrap heap. Station Casinos is shedding three of their nine Las Vegas properties. Texas Station, Fiesta Rancho, and Fiesta Henderson are being torn down and the land underneath them has been put up for sale. Because these are locals-oriented casinos situated off the Las Vegas Strip, this wasn’t a national news story.

Texas Station in North Las Vegas happens to be the place where Floyd Mayweather Jr made his professional boxing debut. We have a suggestion for whoever buys the property – how about some sort of permanent marker to commemorate the event? One doesn’t have to like Floyd to acknowledge that he left a large footprint. Monuments have been built in homage to boxers of far less prominence.

Mayweather made his pro debut on Oct. 11, 1996, on a Top Rank show staged in a small outdoor arena. Two other future world title-holders – Diego “Chico” Corrales and Eric Morel – appeared on the undercard. The featured bout pit Johnny Tapia in a WBO 115-pound world title defense against Sammy Stewart (Tapia TKO 7). In hindsight, it was a show that merited more ink than it got.

By then, Bob Arum was well-established in the city. The first sighting of him had come in December of 1976 when he co-promoted a show at the Aladdin featuring Earnie Shavers. The following year, Arum co-promoted several more shows at the Aladdin, the most noteworthy of which was an October card that marked the first 10-rounder for U.S. Olympian Leon Spinks who was matched against Minnesota journeyman Scott LeDoux.

Arum’s partners in these ventures were veteran matchmaker Mel “Red” Greb, who kept his day job as a craps dealer, and the noted wise guy Irving “Ash” Resnick, a casino host whose specialty was collecting unpaid markers. Neon Leon managed only a draw against LeDoux which made it all the more shocking when he upset Muhammad Ali four months later.

The Aladdin was imploded in 1998. It sat where Planet Hollywood now sits. Two years earlier, the Hacienda was torn down to make way for Mandalay Bay. A small casino at the far south end of the Strip, the Hacienda housed club fights in its so-called Matador Ballroom. Arum has fond memories.

In February of 1981, Arum initiated a series of monthly shows at the Hacienda which were televised on the fledgling ESPN network. His second and fourth shows featured a fresh-faced, 21-year-old super bantamweight from Massachusetts who would go on to become a big local attraction. The kid’s name was Freddie Roach.

Arum took Freddie Roach with him when he settled in at the Showboat where the Top Rank ESPN series had a long run beginning in 1982.

There were actually two unrelated properties with Showboat motifs operating simultaneously in Las Vegas, one situated on the Las Vegas Strip and the other on Boulder Highway on the outskirts of the downtown gambling district. This second Showboat whose signature attraction was the bowling alley, a key stop on the professional tour, was heavily vested in boxing before Arum came along and crashed the party.

Freddie Roach had 15 fights on Top Rank shows at the Showboat, all of which were main events. He won 10. In his final fight here, he passed the torch, in a manner of speaking, to Greg Haugen, who stopped him in the seventh round. Haugen supplanted Roach and Texas lightweight Robin Blake as the ‘Boat’s most popular “house fighter.” He was 8-0 at the Showboat and won another fight for Top Rank on an ESPN show at the Sahara prior to wresting the IBF world lightweight title from Jimmy Paul at Caesars Palace.

The Showboat, which bore the name Castaways in its end days, is long gone. The casino with its 19-story hotel tower was demolished in July of 2005 and is now the site of an apartment complex.

Of all the Las Vegas hotel-casinos that have passed into antiquity, none is as fabled as the Sands. The Rat Pack frolicked here.

The number of boxing shows hosted by the Sands can be counted on one hand, but Bob Arum turned up here too. Top Rank promoted the March 30, 1991 card at which 19-year-old featherweight Rafael Ruelas stamped himself a rising star with a third-round blast-out of former title-holder Stevie Cruz. Future Hall of Famer James Toney appeared on the undercard in a stay-busy fight. Toney’s next bout would come against IBF middleweight champion Michael Nunn.

The Sands was reduced to rubble on Nov. 26, 1996. A mega-resort, the Venetian, rose like a Phoenix from the ashes.

Twenty years later, in the summer of 2016, another iconic Las Vegas casino-resort went poof when the Riviera was blasted into oblivion. Arum wasn’t nearly as active at this property as was his great rival Don King, but he brought Marvelous Marvin Hagler here in March of 1984 to oppose the rugged Argentine battler Juan Domingo Roldan.  Hagler, the undisputed world middleweight champion, was making his ninth title defense. He stopped Roldan in the 10th round.

Several of the venues where Top Rank did business are still standing but have been re-branded. The Las Vegas Hilton, where Arum parked Ali-Spinks I, morphed into the Westgate. The Holiday Casino, where Arum had a cup of coffee in 1990 (Michael Carbajal vs. Fernando Martinez was the featured bout) became Harrah’s. Bally’s, the city’s original MGM Grand, is in the process of being re-branded the Horseshoe. George Foreman fought one of his comeback fights at Bally’s on a Top Rank promotion.

There’s an old saying that when one window of opportunity closes, another opens. Bob Arum would know. Through all the hubbub, Arum never missed a beat. When in a pinch, he always found a new roosting place for one of his smaller shows as he was plotting another grand spectacle.

The newest addition to the ever-evolving Las Vegas skyline is Resorts World, a 3,506-room mega-resort that opened in June of last year. In March, the property on the grounds of the demolished Stardust held its first boxing event. Predictably, it was a Top Rank promotion. Top Rank returns here next month with a card featuring the return of Teofimo Lopez.

There will come a day when Resorts World joins its Las Vegas forerunners in the casino graveyard. It’s just the natural order of things. My goodness, will the indefatigable Bob Arum out-live this joint too?

To  comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Arne K. Lang’s latest book, titled “George Dixon, Terry McGovern and the Culture of Boxing in America, 1890-1910,” will shortly roll off the press. The book, published by McFarland, can be pre-ordered directly from the publisher (https://mcfarlandbooks.com/product/clashof-the-little-giants) or via Amazon.

Featured Articles

Rest In Peace Eder Jofre

Published

on

R.est-in-Peace-Eder-Jofre

“I just thrill at that boy’s performance. He is a marvel of boxing perfection. There is nothing he cannot do.” – Barney Ross.

Between 1957 when he turned professional and 1965 when Fighting Harada caught up with him, Eder Jofre was 46-0-3. He reached heights that so few fighters have reached that you could probably name them without straining. He passed away this morning in Sau Paulo, Brazil, from pneumonia aged eighty-six. He had been hospitalised since March.

To say that his was a life well lived is an understatement.

Jofre was born in Sau Paulo in 1936, a decade that reflected this one in that it was a time of great political upheaval in his beloved Brazil, the thirties seeing the end of the Brazilian Republic, a communist uprising, a fascist uprising, and iterations of new constitutions peeled off like playing cards. It seemed to be sport, not politics that drove Jofre’s people though and his father had tried a fair hand at amateur boxing, later joining his brother to become a coach. The stars aligned and a fistic immortal rose from Brazil’s political ruins.

“At a young age,” wrote Chris Smith, author of the definitive Jofre biography Brazil’s First Boxing Champion, “[his father] put the gloves on Eder and started teaching him techniques and punching patterns…it wasn’t long before little Eder was jumping rope with the professionals.”

By the time he was seven years old, he was training like an amateur boxer and soberly asking his father’s permission to thrash school bullies. By the age of sixteen he was fighting as an amateur and in 1956 he was a part of the Brazilian Olympic team that travelled to Melbourne, Australia where he was eliminated before the medals by Chilean Claudio Barrientos – who would be stopped in eight rounds by Jofre when they met up again in the professional ranks.

Those professional ranks beckoned him a few months after his Olympic failure, the same time at which he decided to become a vegetarian, something he remained committed to until his death.  Early results were good. While Jofre was troubled by a tiny handful of South American draws, a local phenomenon that called for a wider separation of the fighters that was generally called for in the rest of the world, “O Galo De Ouro” as he would soon come to be known had set upon the road that would culminate in one of the finest runs in bantamweight and boxing history.

Another foible of the South American boxing landscape of the 1950s and 1960s was that in the unlikely event that you were able to free yourself from the massed banditry of the local toughs, you would often have to meet with ranked opposition before you were even allowed to contest for regional titles. Imagine the horror this notion would inflict upon the rather spoiled fighters of today, fighters who often achieve world championships without having to meet with the best.

For his part, Jofre ran up against the Filipino Leo Espinosa in June of 1959. Espinosa, a former flyweight, had extended the immortal Pascual Perez the full fifteen in 1956, even picking up a few rounds, before conquering a man who would soon be a fine champion in his own right, Pone Kingpetch, in 1957. He had a pedigree in excess of Jofre who had boxed just twenty-five contests.  Jofre admitted to his father before this fight that he was afraid, and his father suggested they cancel.

“No.  That’s the way it is.  Afraid or not, I am fighting.”

Such was his life.

It was not just Jofre’s career which was in its infancy but also the boxing in Brazil – Espinosa seems to have been only the second world-class fighter to visit the country and so as Eder went, so did boxing in Brazil. Jofre did not let his countrymen down. In the fifth he dropped the visiting Filipino with a gorgeous left hook – there is a famous photograph of Jofre bouncing, looking away from his fallen foe, his feet not touching the ground, frozen with both feet an inch above the canvas, floating. Espinosa got his disorganised legs under him and although he remained cool as Jofre’s battle-fever and inexperience showed, there was little likelihood of his winning after suffering such a blow. Jofre had graduated in a ten-round decision.

This set him loose on the trail of the South American Bantamweight title, a far more worthy, storied championship than it is today and held by the world-ranked Argentine Ernesto Miranda. For those who are not aware, Argentina-Brazil is as great a sporting rivalry as exists and his series with Miranda was the key rivalry of the first half of Jofre’s career. The two had met twice in 1957, registering a pair of draws before their respective careers diverged, and now they were to settle matters for the title. Their third fight, in February of 1960, was a strange affair in which Eder fought aggressively but was made to miss by Miranda, who never looked like winning but who boxed carefully enough to undermine Jofre’s offence.

This lack of aggression makes Miranda’s behaviour prior to their fourth encounter a few months later even stranger. Miranda behaved like a man fueled by hate, even stooping so low as to send insulting letters to Jofre’s wife and family. One must be wary of projecting on to great historical figures in unpicking their motives but here it seems to me is a key moment for Jofre. His bad intentions seem to me to have been unlocked by Miranda, not just in the fourth and final fight of their rivalry but for all time. Not even world-class opposition would be safe after this night.

It was not that Jofre was more aggressive than in their third fight, but rather he seems to have been more controlled. He missed less, countered more and made a backfoot fight impossible for Miranda.  They waged war with not a moment’s doubt as to the outcome. It was Jofre in three. After destroying his rival in the ring, Jofre the man found it within himself to forgive Miranda for some obscene pre-fight behaviour and even take him into his confidences.

It was inevitable now that Jofre would receive a shot at the title although for the privilege, Jofre had to travel to Los Angeles where he dominated and stopped the overmatched Eloy Sanchez in November of 1960. A brief and disturbing brush with the Italian Mafia aside, the championship fight went off without a hitch. Jofre cheerly named the bantamweight title a wedding gift for his wife-to-be.

In 1961 Jofre was matched with the world-class Italian Piero Rollo. Rollo had been beaten before, but never stopped by punches – so brutally did Jofre handle him that he was unable to answer the bell for the tenth. It was a sensational display of total dominance.

“I am never in a hurry,” Jofre explained, that control again.

“He is the best bantam in the world,” offered a barely recognisable Rollo.

I submit that Jofre was by this point already technically complete. When he met Johnny Caldwell the following year – Caldwell, too, made the awful mistake of making his contest with Jofre personal – he was as beautifully balanced as it is possible for a fighter to be, almost never out of punching position, delivering on boxing’s manual on shot after shot while also riffing on the classics. His uppercut, especially, was a thing of genuine beauty; Jofre could make space for that punch almost anywhere and throw it from unusual ranges and angles, making of it then a feint that certainly tied Caldwell in knots. An unbeaten Northern Irishman, it is hard to exaggerate just how tough this man was, but Jofre beat him so badly as to see him rescued by his distressed manager in the tenth.

The title picture, which had become confused by the retirement of Jose Becerra, was now clear – it was Jofre. Indisputably the world’s number one bantamweight, he would remain so for the first half of the 1960s, dismissing Herman Marquez, Kat Aoki, and, against the man most likely to rule if Jofre had never been born, he repeated his 1960 knockout of Jose Medel, this time in just six rounds. In 1964 he turned in his last great winning performance against Bernardo Caraballo, one of the most underrated bantamweights of all and the most underrated bantamweight of the era. Caraballo, out of Columbia, passed away himself earlier this year, and just as Jofre led the charge for boxing in Brazil, so did Caraballo in his country.

In the 1960s, in their primes, they duke it out ring-centre for control, both stylists, both big for the weight, both hungry for personal and national glory. This, I suspect, is not a fight any 118lb man could win against Jofre and soon enough Caraballo is moving away square, disorganised, harassed.  He succumbed in seven.

Jofre spans the eras. When he won his titles he was boxing for the old incarnations, the NYSAC, the NBA, by the time he lost them, he was defending the WBC and WBA championships, certainty ebbed even as his greatness flowed. The wonderful Fighting Harada was the man who came for him, by then tight at the weight and giving up a clear style advantage to his Japanese foe, Jofre was still able to make the rematch razor-thin after dropping a clear decision in the first fight. More glory awaited at featherweight in something of a second career, but Jofre’s best was behind him. He finally hung them up in 1976 during Muhammad Ali’s second reign; when he turned professional, Rocky Marciano had just retired.

This is a very short version of a very great ring-career. What is not posited here is his personal life. Eder’s was rich. He was happily married to Cidinha for more than fifty years; he had a close relationship with his children, who travelled with him, not least in his twilight years when Jofre revisited the site of his title-winning fight with Eloy Sanchez. He lived a life any one of us could be proud of after boxing, working in politics and Brazilian civil service, continuing to make friends right up until the very end.

I spoke to author Chris Smith about his enduring memory of Jofre, with whom he worked closely on their recently published book.

“A year ago, I had the pleasure of hosting him and his two kids and I asked him a few times “how are you feeling champ?” And he’d always respond “very, very happy.”  He told me he was the happiest person in the world.”

Beat that.

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame Returns plus Local Philly Fight News

Published

on

Atlantic-City-Boxing-Hall-of-Fame-Returns-plus-Local-Philly-Fight-News

Still coming out of a global pandemic which suspended the 2020 ceremony and forced a limited version of the celebratory weekend last year, 2022 marks not only a return to normalcy for the Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame (ACBHOF), but it gives a chance for fans to get the full interactive experience. This year, for the first time, all of the weekend’s festivities including the Induction Ceremony on Sunday, Oct. 9, will take place at one location, the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino.

“This year we are really excited about the new things we have to offer fans, while we continue to deliver the type of access we’ve become known for,” states ACBHOF founder Ray McCline. “We want fans to understand that this weekend [second weekend of October] is going to be our home from now on. Working with Hard Rock has been special, and they’ve helped us with a lot of the logistics to really blend what they do [music entertainment] with the sports world and our event.” After listening to McCline passionately speaking about his goal to bring the sports legends and legendary fights back to life for the proud resort city that has a special role in boxing history, a sense of relief can be heard from McCline regarding the past obstacles the ACBHOF has dealt with.

“So far each of the past weekends have had their hiccups, those things happen when you’re hosting such a large event with so many moving pieces. This partnership allows for fans to come to one main site and stay immersed in all things boxing and music for the whole weekend,” says McCline. From the opening V.I.P. party on Friday night to the memorabilia show that will feature interactive displays with some of the sport’s legends teaching boxing basics, McCline wants the Hall of Fame Weekend to be known as the weekend when both fans and legendary boxers mingle in an up-close and personal way.

This year’s class includes Lennox Lewis, James Toney, Frank Fletcher, Kathy Duva (promoter), Kevin Rooney Sr. (trainer), and Pat Lynch (manager). Except for the V.I.P. party that starts the weekend and the Induction Ceremony that closes out the weekend, every other event is free and open to the public, notes McCline.

Some tickets remain for the kick-off party and ceremony. Fans interested in attending can visit ACBHOF for all the details.

____

Marshall Kauffman’s Kings Promotions is presenting a show tonight (Saturday, Oct. 1) at Philadelphia’s 2300 Arena featuring bantamweight standout Christian Carto (19-1, 13 KOs) taking on his toughest test since his return. He battles Argentina’s Hector Sosa (14-1, 8 KOs) the former South American super bantamweight champion. Carto is always in fan-friendly fights and with a victory over Sosa can reemerge as a potential world championship challenger soon.

Light heavyweight Atif Oberlton (6-0, 5 KOs) returns to action in the co-feature. Oberlton was an accomplished amateur and many local boxing observers are dubbing the Philadelphian a future world champion.

Next weekend, on Friday night October 7th, several staples in Philadelphia boxing return to the Xcite Event Center at Parx Casino in Bensalem. Joe Hand Promotions and Joey “Tank” Dawejko (22-10-4, 13 KOs) are teaming up with Hall of Fame promoter Russell Peltz for a night of action featuring some of the best local talent.

Dawejko, a long-time fringe heavyweight contender from the Tacony section of the city fought off any talk of retirement on Sept. 1 when he scored a fourth-round stoppage over Mike Marshall (6-3-1, 4 KOs). Dawejko was back in the ring for the first time in seven months after deciding to make one final push towards heavyweight glory.

Dawejko takes on veteran Terrell Jamal Woods (28-53-9, 20 KOs) of Forrest City, AR, in a scheduled eight-round bout. Prior to his victory over Marshall, Dawejko contemplated hanging up his gloves in favor of the roofing business that he established this year. However, after a lengthy conversation with promoter Russell Peltz, the two agreed to team up again for one last run in the sport. At just 32 years old, Dawejko has had a fruitful career and not just from a financial standpoint. He has competed all over the world and has never turned down an opportunity at a big fight, or to join top contenders and champions in their training camps.

Many of Dawejko’s major career opportunities were taken at the last minute. This last push by him is about finally reaching for the one thing missing from his professional career, a gold belt that he can display that signifies that he was at one point one of the best heavyweights on the planet. Against Marshall he displayed fast hands and pin-point accuracy and his fight against Woods on Oct. 7 should be no different in terms of action and his progression.

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

 

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Avila Perspective, Chap. 205: Zurdo Ramirez and More SoCal Fight Talk

Published

on

Avila-Perspective-Chap-205-Zurdo-Ramirez-and-More-SoCal-Fight-Talk

Southern California gyms are heating up even more than usual with major prize fights on the horizon in October.

Gilberto “Zurdo” Ramirez greeted media in downtown Los Angeles recently to chat about his upcoming light heavyweight world championship challenge against WBA titlist Dmitry Bivol in Dubai.

Usually, downtown L.A. is busy with walking and driving traffic, but things are not completely back to normal says the security officer at the Golden Boy Promotions headquarters. The pandemic is still in effect to a small degree.

Mexico’s Ramirez (44-0, 30 KOs) signed to meet Russia’s Bivol (20-0,11 KOs) on Nov. 5, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. It’s a battle of undefeated light heavyweights and round two of Mexico versus Russia.

It was a mere five months ago that Bivol hung a loss over Mexico’s number one fighter Saul “Canelo” Alvarez. Now he meets Ramirez who is several inches taller than Canelo.

Ramirez (pictured with Golden Boy Promotions president Eric Gomez) trains in Los Angeles and signed with Golden Boy primarily for one reason: he wanted a crack at stardom and to fight a world champion with clout. Enter Bivol who slapped Alvarez around for 12 rounds. Neither fighter was ever in danger of going down. Bivol won by unanimous decision.

Many say Bivol was too big for Alvarez, but I think Canelo simply has slipped a little in terms of preparing properly. I call it the “silk pajama syndrome.”

It’s hard to get up at 5 a.m. and train when you sleep in silk pajamas. Ever since Alvarez began hanging out with the yacht club guys and playing golf on a regular basis, he’s lost that hunger. If you’re a prizefighter, hunger is everything.

Canelo admits he plays golf almost every day including during his training periods. He’s also been seen attending Del Mar Racetrack to watch the ponies. Upper crust kind of stuff.

Ramirez, on the other hand, though he doesn’t appear like the usual Mexican roughneck, has a certain schoolboy kind of look. No one would ever guess he comes from a rough Sinaloa upbringing.

Even his manner of talk has a gentle charm.

‘I feel happy and excited to fight for the title with Dmitry Bivol,” said Ramirez inside the Golden Boy headquarters. “I’m ready to show in this fight what I can really do. I’m ready for whatever he brings to the ring.”

Both Bivol and Ramirez have sparred before.

“We didn’t do a lot of sparring,” said Ramirez, adding that it was enough to surmise what to expect when they meet in November.

Another who sparred Ramirez is former two-time super middleweight titlist David Benavidez. Both sparred recently and when asked who was better, Ramirez leaned toward Benavidez.

Interesting.

Zurdo and Benavidez also want a crack at Canelo the Golden Fleece of boxing. But the red head from Guadalajara has balked.

Though Benavidez and Ramirez are very good and capable of giving Canelo a struggle, neither has made a mark on sales. It’s one thing to be undefeated; it’s an entirely different thing to attract fans on television or sell tickets.

If Ramirez beats Bivol he is on the right path. If Benavidez, a very strong fighter, can attract a big name to enter the prize ring with him, then he too can entice Canelo to a showdown.

Jojo and Zepeda in San Diego

Another who appeared in Golden Boy headquarters were lightweight contenders Jojo Diaz and William Zepeda set to clash at the end of October in San Diego.

Diaz, a former American Olympian and two division world champion, last fought in December 2021 against Devin Haney before Haney became undisputed lightweight world champion. Diaz did far better than George Kambosos did against Haney.

The former featherweight and super featherweight world titlist showed moving up in weight was not a problem. And though he lost to Haney, he competed at a high level and landed solidly far more often than the Aussie did.

“When I looked at the tape I saw I could have done more,” said Diaz (32-2-1, 15 KOs) about his loss to Haney.

Now, the South El Monte fighter has a Mexican fighter streaking toward the top in Zepeda.

Mexico City’s Zepeda (26-0, 23 KOs) burst on the American scene two years ago during the height of the pandemic and soundly defeated two ranked American fighters in Roberto Ramirez and Hector Tanajara. Add two more knockout wins since then and the hard-hitting southpaw has blazed a path to the top.

Now its lefty versus lefty at the Pechanga Arena in San Diego on Saturday Oct. 29. Tickets are now on sale.

“I’m facing a very talented young fighter,” said Zepeda, 26. “It can be a good victory to beat a former world champion.”

Diaz, 29, expects and desires only hard fights.

“This fight represents everything. I’m coming off a defeat to Devin Haney,” said Diaz. “I’ve got a big set of balls and love to fight the best.”

It’s a Golden Boy Promotions card and will also feature the return of welterweight contender Alexis Rocha.

Commerce Casino

Six undefeated prospects are set to perform on Saturday Oct. 1, at Commerce Casino in the City of Commerce, California. The boxing card is staged by Elite Promotions and Red Boxing and partnering with nonprofit Breast Cancer Angles from Los Alamitos, Calif. to support their cause.

Situated near East Los Angeles, the casino has recently become a popular location for local club shows. Doors open at 5:30 p.m.

Expected to perform on the fight card are Brandon Mendoza, Cristopher Rios, and William King. For more information contact: redboxinginternational@gmail.com.

Premier Boxing Champions

Super welterweight contenders Sebastian Fundora (19-0-1, 13 KOs) and Mexico’s Carlos Ocampo (34-1, 22 KOs) meet on Saturday, Oct. 8, at Dignity Sports Park Complex in Carson, Calif. Showtime will televise the interim WBC super welterweight title fight.

Known as the “Towering Inferno” because of his 6’5” height, Fundora lives and trains in Southern California and defeated world title challenger Erikson Lubin by technical knockout last April in Las Vegas. He’s trained by Ben Lira.

Tickets are on sale for the card that also features Dominican fighter Carlos Adames who upset Sergiy Derevyanchenko last December by majority decision. Adames meets Mexico’s Juan Macias Montiel who battled Jermall Charlo 12 rounds and lost by decision for the WBC middleweight title.

SoCal note

Riverside’s veteran trainer Willy Silva contacted us to mention his nephew Sebastian Estrada (4-0, 4 KOs) faces undefeated Fidel Samano Lopez (5-0, 4 KOs) in a battle of undefeated super lightweights on Saturday in San Luis Rio, Mexico. It’s the main event.

Silva has trained many former top contenders such as Mauricio Herrera, Carlos Bojorquez, and Jose Reynoso the nephew of Saul “Canelo” Alvarez’s first trainer Jose “Chepo” Reynoso.

Photo credit: Al Applerose

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Elite-Trainer-Jesse-Reid-Has-Schooled-Some-of-Boxing's-Most-Mercurial-Champions
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Elite Trainer Jesse Reid Has Schooled Some of Boxing’s Most Mercurial Champions

Canelo-is-Still-Mostly-Canelo-the-Canelo-That-We-Remember-but-GGG-is-Another-Story
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Canelo is Still Mostly the Canelo That We Remember, but GGG is Another Story

Fast-Results-from-Las-Vegas-Where-Canelo-Defeated-GGG-Without-Controversy
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Fast Results from Las Vegas Where Canelo Defeated GGG Without Controversy

Canelo-GGG-III-Odds-and-Ends
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Canelo-GGG III: Odds and Ends

Atlantic-City-Boxing-Hall-of-Fame-Returns-plus-Local-Philly-Fight-News
Featured Articles2 days ago

Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame Returns plus Local Philly Fight News

Ex-Heavyweight-Champ-Andy-Ruiz-Victorious-in-LA-Plus-Undercard-Results
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Ex-Heavyweight Champ Andy Ruiz Victorious in LA Plus Undercard Results

Avila-Perspective-Chap-203-Canelo-GGG-3-and-More
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 203: Canelo-GGG 3 and More

Arne's-Almanac-Goldfield's-First-Big-Fight-an-Argentine-Ring-God-and-More
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Arne’s Almanac: Goldfield’s First Big Fight, An Argentine Ring God and More

The-Hauser-Report-Queen-Elizabeth-Henry-Cooper-and-More
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

The Hauser Report: Queen Elizabeth II, Henry Cooper, and More

Avila-Perspective-Chap-204-Shakur-Amanda-and-Heavyweights
Featured Articles1 week ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 204: Shakur Stevenson, Amanda and Heavyweights

Earnie-Shavers-Baseball-Connection
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Earnie Shavers’ Baseball Connection

Avila-Perspective-Chap-202-Shields-vs-Marshall-Tops-a-Blockbuster-Week-for-Women
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 202: Shields vs Marshall Tops a Blockbuster Week for Women

Liam-Smith-Scores-a-Quirky-KO-in-Liverpool-Natasha-Jonas-Wins-Too
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Liam Smith Scores a Quirky KO in Liverpool; Natasha Jonas Wins Too

Fast-Results-from-Newark-Where-Shakur-Conquered-Conceicao
Featured Articles1 week ago

Fast Results from Newark Where Shakur Conquered Conceicao

Joe-Joyce-was-too-much-The-Juggernaut-for-Joseph-Parker-in-Manchester
Featured Articles1 week ago

Joe Joyce was too much The Juggernaut for Joseph Parker in Manchester

A-Wide-Ranging-Discussion-with-Manny-Pacquiao-Biographer-Gary-Andrew-Poole
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

A Wide-Ranging Discussion with Manny Pacquiao Biographer Gary Andrew Poole

Avila-Perspective-Chap-205-Zurdo-Ramirez-and-More-SoCal-Fight-Talk
Featured Articles2 days ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 205: Zurdo Ramirez and More SoCal Fight Talk

Joe-Joyce-and-Joe-Parker-Meet=at-the-Crossroads-and-the-Likely-Winner-is...
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Joe Joyce and Joe Parker meet at the Crossroads and the Likely Winner is….

Catching-Up-With-Paul=Spadafora-A-New-Beginning-for-the-Pittsburgh-Kid?
Featured Articles3 days ago

Catching up with Paul Spadafora: A New Beginning for the ‘Pittsburgh Kid’?

Big-Baby-Miller-on-the-Comeback-Trail-How-Far-Can-He-Go?
Featured Articles7 days ago

“Big Baby” Miller on the Comeback Trail: How Far Can He Go?

R.est-in-Peace-Eder-Jofre
Featured Articles12 hours ago

Rest In Peace Eder Jofre

Atlantic-City-Boxing-Hall-of-Fame-Returns-plus-Local-Philly-Fight-News
Featured Articles2 days ago

Atlantic City Boxing Hall of Fame Returns plus Local Philly Fight News

Avila-Perspective-Chap-205-Zurdo-Ramirez-and-More-SoCal-Fight-Talk
Featured Articles2 days ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 205: Zurdo Ramirez and More SoCal Fight Talk

Catching-Up-With-Paul=Spadafora-A-New-Beginning-for-the-Pittsburgh-Kid?
Featured Articles3 days ago

Catching up with Paul Spadafora: A New Beginning for the ‘Pittsburgh Kid’?

Big-Baby-Miller-on-the-Comeback-Trail-How-Far-Can-He-Go?
Featured Articles7 days ago

“Big Baby” Miller on the Comeback Trail: How Far Can He Go?

Joe-Joyce-was-too-much-The-Juggernaut-for-Joseph-Parker-in-Manchester
Featured Articles1 week ago

Joe Joyce was too much The Juggernaut for Joseph Parker in Manchester

Fast-Results-from-Newark-Where-Shakur-Conquered-Conceicao
Featured Articles1 week ago

Fast Results from Newark Where Shakur Conquered Conceicao

Avila-Perspective-Chap-204-Shakur-Amanda-and-Heavyweights
Featured Articles1 week ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 204: Shakur Stevenson, Amanda and Heavyweights

Murphy's-Law-Has-Redounded-into-a-Bountful-Day-of-Boxing-in-Mid-October
Featured Articles1 week ago

Murphy’s Law Has Redounded into a Bountiful Day of Boxing in Mid-October

Joe-Joyce-and-Joe-Parker-Meet=at-the-Crossroads-and-the-Likely-Winner-is...
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Joe Joyce and Joe Parker meet at the Crossroads and the Likely Winner is….

A-Wide-Ranging-Discussion-with-Manny-Pacquiao-Biographer-Gary-Andrew-Poole
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

A Wide-Ranging Discussion with Manny Pacquiao Biographer Gary Andrew Poole

Canelo-is-Still-Mostly-Canelo-the-Canelo-That-We-Remember-but-GGG-is-Another-Story
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Canelo is Still Mostly the Canelo That We Remember, but GGG is Another Story

Fast-Results-from-Las-Vegas-Where-Canelo-Defeated-GGG-Without-Controversy
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Fast Results from Las Vegas Where Canelo Defeated GGG Without Controversy

Canelo-GGG-III-Odds-and-Ends
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Canelo-GGG III: Odds and Ends

Avila-Perspective-Chap-203-Canelo-GGG-3-and-More
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 203: Canelo-GGG 3 and More

Arne's-Almanac-Goldfield's-First-Big-Fight-an-Argentine-Ring-God-and-More
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Arne’s Almanac: Goldfield’s First Big Fight, An Argentine Ring God and More

Elite-Trainer-Jesse-Reid-Has-Schooled-Some-of-Boxing's-Most-Mercurial-Champions
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Elite Trainer Jesse Reid Has Schooled Some of Boxing’s Most Mercurial Champions

The-Hauser-Report-Queen-Elizabeth-Henry-Cooper-and-More
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

The Hauser Report: Queen Elizabeth II, Henry Cooper, and More

Gridiron-Stars-Peterson-and-Bell-to-Give-Take-Some-Really-Off-Tackle-Hits
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Gridiron Stars Bell and Peterson to Give, Take Some Really Off-Tackle Hits

Yokasta-Valle-Wins-a-Second-Belt-in-Costa-Rica-Shields-vs-Marshall-Postponed
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Yokasta Valle Wins a Second Belt in Costa Rica; Shields vs Marshall Postponed

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Advertisement