Connect with us

Featured Articles

Atlas, Steward and Goldsticker On How To Fix USA Boxing

Avatar

Published

on

photoTeddy Atlas has never met an opinion he won't offer. It is in his fiber to keep it real, and tell it like it is, and if feathers get ruffled, well, tough tamales. The ESPN analyst offered up some suggestions and critiques about USA Boxing after the Games ended in London, with the lone bright spots coming on the women's side, with Claressa Shields' gold and Marlen Esparza's bronze.

First off, Atlas said in the future, he'd like to have desire and attitude factored in more when choosing a team. “I'd rather have guys less that are less athletic and care more about representing us and the opportunity, taking it as an honor,” he said a few days after coming back from his three week stay in London.

“We have to re-think the whole system,” he said. That starts with some Romney-style management decisions. “The first thing is, there have to be a lot of pink slips,” he said, with an eye on the USA Boxing brain trust. “It's badly organized, badly run, just like AIBA (International Amateur Boxing Association, which oversaw the London tourney, and has been accused of corruption).”

Here's a quickie refresher on the banana-peel laden path to the London Games…

Choosing a coach a month before the Games, as was done when Basheer Abdullah was inserted after Joe Zanders was yanked from his position before the Games, just a few months after replacing Dan Campbell, who oversaw the 2008 squad, which also stank the joint out, certainly didn't help matters. You'll recall the 2008 squad was in rampant disarray, with fighters in a constant state of mutiny. As Gary Russell Sr. put it to Mitch Abramson of the NY Daily News after the Beijing Games, “(Campbell) had so many arguments with these boxers it's like he's setting them all up for failure. He's threatened to throw Sadam (Ali), Demetrius, Rau'Shee (Warren), Javier (Molina), Gary Russel Jr. and Luis all off the team. That's six boxers, more than half the team. Something has to be wrong if you're threatening to get rid of half the team. It can't all be the fault of the boxers.” Campbell “retired” a bit after Beijing, and one had to think that things could only get better. Joe Zanders was hired as the US national coach in January 2011, one might say an awful long time to go without a head of the program following the Campbell departure. But then there was reason for optimism; we heard that personal coaches would get more input with the kids, and that Freddie Roach would come in and lend a hand. Zanders got the official title of head coach for London in August 2011, and publicy, things seemed to be OK. He and Roach seemingly–seemingly– co-existed nicely. But in mid March, word came that Zanders was out after the USA showing at the 2011 worlds–a lone bronze for the Stars and Stripers– didn't impress the United States Olympic Committee (USOC). Or, “promoted,” as the release put it, in yet another example of the goofy workings of USA Boxing. The Roach experiment went awry with whispers that Zanders didn't care for Freddie's presence all that much. And the release of tape of Roach labeling super heavyweight Michael Hunter as “lazy” further poisoned the waters. Basheer Adullah, who coached the 2004 squad, was named head coach on June 27, a scant month before the games kicked off. Things went goofy again a few days before the first bout, when it was learned that Abdullah couldn't coach ringside, because he'd been involved with pros too recently. This shouldn't have been a WTH moment for USA Boxing officials making such decisions, as it wasn't some obscure rule added to the rulebook at the 11th hour, under darkness. So, with Adullah yelling instructions away from ringside, and personal coaches using bullhorns to yell instructions to fighters from rows back in the arena, the fighters got fighting, and you know how that turned out.

Atlas would like the coach to be picked a good spell in advance, so that guy can help carve out a system, and see the athletes at tourneys, and trials. Whether that occurs is up to the gang that runs USA Boxing; Anthony Bartkowski is the director. As for a head coach, Atlas is more than open to a foreigner taking over the reigns. A Cuban would be stellar, as they've had success with the points system in place. Brit Terry Edwards in fact was rumored to have the job before it landed in Abdullah's lap, so it seems that possibility is in play.

Another thing we might see if Atlas had his druthers. The Staten Islander likes what the NFL does, using the intelligence and problem solving test, the Wonderlic Test, to weed out problems before the draft.

Hey, what about you, Teddy? Would Atlas take the reins, and coach the squad in Brazil in 2016, if asked?

“They'd have to fire people first,” he said. “I wouldn't do it like Freddie Roach, show up and have it be like a photo opp. I'd want to do something if I could make a difference.”

One man who has tasted extreme success in the pro ranks, and thought he could help resurrect the Team USA fortunes is Emanuel Steward. The trainer-manager-TV analyst-promoter chatted with TSS about how to address our medal drought.

Steward agreed that the correct word is “disaster” when evaluating the showing by the men in London. Steward, who acted as national director of coaching for USA Boxing heading into the 2004 Olympics in Greece, has become so disenchanted with the American amateur muddle, that he admitted he basically knows almost nothing about any of the fighters who comprised the team. “Now I didn't even know who was on the team,” he admitted to me.
“The whole program fell part,” he told me. “The last team of note was maybe 1988,” he said, allowing that the rare diamond like Andre Ward, in 2004, still occasionally shines through the gloom.

Steward said the US used to produce superb athletes in track and field, and boxing, but no more. The question begs…why?

Start with the lack of international compeition, Steward said. back in 1974, 1975, heading toward the Games in Montreal, boxers who were a lock for the US squad were fighting frequently in tournaments pitting USA vs Cuba, and Poland and Germany, Steward said. “And by the time the Olympics came, they were already household names,” he said, noting that the tourneys also gave the fighters ample seasoning, something this squad lacked bigtime. “I'm a manager, and I've never heard of these guys,” he said. “Get them on TV!”

Ray Leonard and Leon Spinks lost at overseas tourneys, and learned how to bounce back, he said. Also, the judges working those shows, some of whom would work in the Olympics, became familiar, in a good way, with the boxers.

The way the world looks at America doesn't help matters, the Kronk sage stated. “We've created so many enemies,” he said. “They lok at America as the rich, spoiled brat. They don't believe that the team has little funding, that there's no money in the amateur program.” Thus, the Hall of Famer implied, it is not mere sour grapes when we hear analysts complain that judges are screwing over Americans during Olympic bouts. It is payback time, to a degree, for the policies and attitude of our nation, in the geo-political arena. America is seen as somewhat of a bully that needs a takedown; but also, many folks still aspire to make it here, so they look up to our fighters, and raise their games that much more to impress watchers. If I beat the American, they tend to think, that is a meaningful victory.

Julie Goldsticker, who ran the media relations for the team, and has done work for USA Boxing since 2001, is quite likely the single best source if you are looking for the one person who has seen what the program has done right, and wrong, in the last decade. So I asked for her input on how to tweak USA Boxing, so we start getting the medal count, and turning out the sort of fighters most think America is capable of turning out.

“Everyone wants one answer,” she told me. “They wonder why we didn't succeed, they probably need more international experience, and more time with the coaches in their corner, and other stuff, there isn't one easy fix.”

Budget cuts, by the USOC, certainly had a huge effect on the team, she agreed. The budget for USA Boxing was cut after the last Games, because of a poor medal count, and the fear is that trend will continue. Less than $500,000 for a year, to pay salaries, and fund travel to tournaments overseas, so the kids can get seasoning, doesn't cut it. Goldsticker would love to see some of the alumni step up, and open up their checkbook, to fill the vacuum.

“Oscar de la Hoya had a lot to say during the Games,” she noted. “We've reached out to him a lot, and if it's money, or time, if he just wants to give his time, we'd love the help. If Oscar wanted to fund an international event, he could.” Goldsticker, who does PR work for Andre Ward, says Ward has done his part giving back to USA Boxing.

She said that picking a coach early is on the radar of USA Boxing, so hopefully, the continuity issue will be attended to, so we aren't repeating this same column, or, at least, that same element of the column, after Brazil.

For those hoping, as I do, that personal coaches, guys who have been working with fighters for five, seven or more years, will get to travel to the Olympics, and work the corners of the fighters…sorry. Goldsticker says that there are only so many credentials to go round, that it would be too unwieldy to allow a personal coach for every person on the team. Thus, she said, it is super important for personal coaches to get onboard with the system devised by the national team head.

Readers, feel free to pitch in with your ideas. After all, this is the Team USA we are talking about. It is “your” team, they represent you as a nation. If you have some ideas on how to get things moving in the right direction; I will collect them, and present them down the line to someone at USA Boxing, and see if we can't collectively help get us to where we want to be, where we can be, where we should be.

Comment on this article

Featured Articles

Dan Parker Bashed the Bad Guys in Boxing and Earned a Ticket to the Hall of Fame

Arne K. Lang

Published

on

Dan-Parker-Bashed-the-Bad-Guys-in-Boxing-and-Earned-a-Ticket-to-the-Hall-of-Fame

Twenty-five years ago this month, sportswriter Dan Parker was formally ushered into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in the non-participant category. Parker wasn’t there to enjoy the moment. He had been dead going on 30 years.

Dan Parker, who began his career in journalism as a court reporter in his native Waterbury, Connecticut, hired on with the New York Daily Mirror in 1924, was named sports editor two years later, and remained with the paper until it folded during a prolonged newspaper strike in 1963, a total of 39 years.

Parker has been underappreciated by historians of the sports page because he worked for a paper that didn’t make the cut when advances in microphotography allowed copies of old newspapers to be stored on microfilm. During this reporter’s days as a college student — and here I date myself – the only out-of-town papers archived in the school library were the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post, and to cull something out of them for a term paper one had to commit to spending long hours manually scrolling through reels of microfilm on a clunky machine. The tabloids – and the Daily Mirror was a tabloid – were considered too lowbrow for serious research, and even today in the digital age, stuff by Dan Parker is hard to find if one doesn’t have the luxury of hunkering down for an extended stay in the periodicals section of the Library of Congress. His online omnibus consists entirely of scattered stories that were picked up by other newspapers and a few magazine pieces.

But among boxing writers, Dan Parker was a giant. He did more than anyone to cleanse the sport of the hoodlum element. The IBHOF electorate has come up with some curious choices in the non-participant category over the years, but in the case of Dan Parker they certainly got it right.

Parker was a big man, carrying about 240 pounds on his six-foot-four frame, but a man’s size is irrelevant when staring into the barrel of a gun and Parker was fearless when facing off with the goons that infested the fight racket. His best year, one might say, was 1955 when a story he authored for Bluebook magazine flowered into an award-winning, six-part series in the Mirror titled “They’re Murdering Boxing.” The series spawned an investigation that ultimately resulted in the imprisonment of Frankie Carbo, boxing’s so-called underworld czar, a man with a long rap sheet, and several of Carbo’s collaborators, most notably Philadelphia numbers baron Frank “Blinky” Palermo.

Parker’s friends urged him to lay off the hoodlums before something bad happened to him, but he ignored their counsel. “Everybody in boxing lived in fear of this enforcer (Frankie Carbo) but not Dan Parker. Nobody ever put enough heat on Parker to slow down his typewriter,” reminisced Hartford Courant sports editor Bill Lee.

Parker’s reputation as a reformer was well-established before he zeroed in on the machinations of Carbo and others of his ilk. In 1944, when a vacancy came up on the New York State Athletic Commission, Governor Thomas Dewey, who had made his reputation as a racket-busting District Attorney, offered the post to Parker.

It was easy money, but he declined. “What would I use for a punching bag if I were on the boxing commission myself?,” he said.

During a portion of Parker’s tenure with the paper, there were eight other New York dailies competing for readers. The Mirror was the paper of choice for well-informed boxing fans thanks in large part to Murray Lewin who came to be recognized as the city’s best fight prognosticator within the ranks of the newspaper writers. Lewin, the boxing beat writer, did the grunt work, attending all the little shows and writing up the summaries. Parker, as he freely admitted, was more interested in writing about sporting characters than about the games they played. And like his good buddy Damon Runyon, who wrote for the New York American (later the Journal-American), Parker was inevitably drawn to boxing and horseracing because that was where the most colorful characters were found.

Parker found time to write one book, a primer for novice horseplayers published in 1947 when horseracing was on the cusp of the boom that would lead it to becoming America’s top spectator sport (a distinction, needless to say, that wouldn’t last).

The book had a chapter on touts, one of Parker’s favorite subjects for his newspaper column. They were all charlatans, he wrote, an opinion that did not endear him to the bean-counters as they were forever cluttering up his sports section with ads from racetrack tipsters. Parker wasn’t afraid to make enemies on his own paper.

Believe it or not, but there were still folks back then who believed that professional wrestling was on the up-and-up. Parker educated them when he wrote a column that gave out all the winners on a show that hadn’t yet started.

The programs for the wrestling shows, which included the bout sheet, were published well in advance and then hidden away until they were needed. Parker procured a copy and from it was able to glean which wrestlers had won their preceding match.

“Dan was a shy, gentle, and kindly man with a quick sense of humor,” wrote New York Times sports editor Arthur Daley. But within his profession, he wasn’t everyone’s cup of tea. The legendary Herald Tribune sports editor Stanley Woodward once likened him to Fearless Fosdick, a character in the L’il Abner comic strip who was a parody of Dick Tracy. Parker had a long-running feud with New York Daily News sportswriter Jimmy Powers which may have had something to do with Powers becoming a well-known radio commentator. In the eyes of the old guard, a true journalist didn’t do “electronic media.”

When Damon Runyon died from cancer of the larynx in 1946, several of his close friends, notably Parker and the famous gossip columnist Walter Winchell, a Daily Mirror colleague, got together and resolved to create a charity in Runyon’s memory. What resulted was a foundation that has raised millions for cancer research. Parker worked tirelessly on its behalf.

Daniel Francis “Dan” Parker died on May 20, 1967, at age 73. He was quite a guy.

Check out more boxing news on video at the Boxing Channel

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

What Next for Gabriel Rosado?

Ted Sares

Published

on

What-Next-for-Gabriel-Rosado

What Next for Gabriel Rosado?

Bektemir Melikuziev, Freddie Roach, Edgar Berlanga, and Jaime Munguia are names that, one way or another, figured into Gabe Rosado’s stunning KO last Saturday night in El Paso. It overshadowed the impressive showing by Noaya “Monster” Inoue later that night in Las Vegas.

Rosado (26-13-1) is a well-documented bleeder and just might start spurting during the walk-in, but he is never, ever in a dull fight. The tougher-than-tough Philadelphian won Top Gore honors for his blood and guts TKO loss to Canadian middleweight star David Lemieux in 2014. The year before, he bled aplenty in his game but losing effort against Gennady Golovkin.

This time against Melikuziev, the unbeaten Uzbek, the fight ended in round three when the 35-year-old underdog beat the Eastern Euro fighter to the punch during an exchange of rights with Gabe’s landing first and sending the former amateur star into dreamland. The force of the blow was amplified by the younger and faster man coming forward with caution to the wind. And this time, there was no bloodletting.

The knockout should be a contender for KO of the Year. In fact, it was reminiscent of Juan Manuel Marquez’s explosive knockout of Manny Pacquiao in their final match.

Once again, Rosado (who is now trained by Freddie Roach) has revived his career and can count on at least one last decent payday. While many think Jaime Munguia would be a solid next fight, the thinking here is that Rosado could get carved up by the undefeated Tijuana veteran who has won 30 of his 37 fights by KO. Munguia is just too good.

The Catch 22

Rosado is an all-action fighter but scar tissue and his propensity to bleed is his worst enemy. It has cost him in the past. For such an offensive-minded fighter as Gabe, he is trapped in a terrible catch-22. If he can get the lead early and the bleeding is stemmed within reasonable limits, he can be a force, but not against the likes of Munguia.

If not Munguia, then who?  Here is one suggestion: How about “The Chosen One,” Edgar Berlanga (17-0) whose first round KO streak recently came to an end. Brooklyn vs. Philadelphia would be a nice added touch –not to mention the Puerto Rican factor. Could Rosado expose Berlanga as someone without enough experience, aka rounds? Would Gabe show that Berlanga is more Tyson Brunson that Edwin Valero?

Let’s make it happen!

Ted Sares enjoys researching and writing about boxing. He also competes as a powerlifter in the Master-class. He can be reached at  tedsares@roadrunner.com

Check out more boxing news on video at the Boxing Channel

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Fast Results from Las Vegas: Inoue Demolishes Dasmarinas; Mayer UD Farias

Arne K. Lang

Published

on

Fast-Results-from-Las-Vegas-Inoue-Demolishes-Dasmarinas-Mayer-UD-Farias

Fast Results from Las Vegas: Inoue Demolishes Dasmarinas; Mayer UD  Farias

LAS VEGAS — Top Rank was at the Virgin Hotels in Las Vegas on Saturday, June 19, for the second of their three June shows. In the headliner, WBA/IBF world bantamweight champion Naoya “Monster” Inoue lived up to his nickname with a vicious third round stoppage of Filipino import Michael Dasmarinas.

Inoue (21-0, 18 KOs) had his opponent fighting off his back foot from the opening bell. He knocked down Dasmarinas in the second with a left hook to the liver and twice more in the third round before referee Russell Mora waived it off. The official time was 2:45.

Dasmarinas brought a 30-2-1 record and hadn’t lost since 2014. But he was no match for the “Monster” who looks younger than his 28 years. Those body shots landed with a thud that could be heard in the far reaches of the arena. This kid is really good.

Mikaela Mayer continues to improve as she showed tonight in the first defense of her WBO world super featherweight title. Mayer 15-0 (5) turned away Argentina’s Erica Farias (26-5) with a 10-round unanimous decision in a fight that was frankly rather monotonous.

Mayer won by scores of 97-93 and 98-92 twice. Farias, who landed the best punch of the fight, didn’t have the taller Mayer’s physical equipment but yet landed the best punch of the fight. Her only setbacks have come on the road against elite opponents—Cecilia Braekhus, Delfine Person, Jessica McCaskill (twice) and now Mikaela Mayer.

The opener on the ESPN portion of the show was a lusty 10-round welterweight affair between Ghana native Isaac Dogboe and Glendale, California’s Adam Lopez. Dogboe, whose only losses came at the hands of Emanuel Navarette in world title fights, improved to 22-2 by dint of a majority decision that could have easily gone the other way. Dave Moretti had it a draw but was overruled (97-93 and 96-94).

Lopez, one of two fighting sons of the late Hector Lopez, an Olympic silver medalist, did his best work late, particularly in the eighth round. With the loss, his record declines to 15-3.

Other Bouts

Monterrey, Mexico super lightweight Lindolfo Delgado, a 2016 Olympian, was extended the distance for the first time in his career but won a wide 8-round decision over Guadalajara’s Salvador Briceno

Delgado won by scores of 80-72 and 79-73 twice while advancing his record to 12-0. Delgado’s best round was the eighth, but Briceno (17-7) weathered the storm. Briceno is 5-6 in his last 11, but has been matched tough. The six fighters to beat him, including Delgado, were a combined 78-3 at the time that he fought them.

Vista, California lightweight Eric Puente has yet to score a KO but he is undefeated in six starts after winning a unanimous decision over Mexico’s Antonio Meza (7-6). Puente, who is trained by Robert Garcia, knocked Meza down early into the fight with a sweeping left and was the aggressor throughout. The judges had it 57-56 and 58-55 twice.

Puerto Rican super lightweight Omar Rosario improved to 4-0 (2) with a fourth-round stoppage of Reno, Nevada’s Wilfred “JJ” Moreno (3-1) The official time was 0:47.

Photo credit: Al Applerose

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Should-a-Boxer-be-Forced-to-Retire-When-He-Reaches-a-Certain-Age-A-New-TSS-Survey
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Should a Boxer be Forced to Retire When He Reaches a Certain Age?: A New TSS Survey

Munguia-and-Rosado-Win-by-Stoppage-in-El-Paso-Rosado-in-Spectacular-Fashion
Featured Articles5 days ago

Munguia and Rosado Win by Stoppage in El Paso; Rosado in a Spectacular Fashion

Devi-Haney-Survives-Scare-to-Overcome-Jorge-Linares-in-Las-Vegas
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Devin Haney Survives Scare to Overcome Jorge Linares in Las Vegas  

Avila-Perspective-Chap-137-Battle-Between-Two-Cities-LA-and-Las-Vegas
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 137: Battle Between Two Cities – L.A. and Las Vegas

Fast-Results-from-Las-Vegas-Shakur-Wins-a-Snoozer-Pedraza-Stops-Rodriguez
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Fast Results from Las Vegas: Shakur Wins a Snoozer; Pedraza Stops Rodriguez

Forged-by-Longtime-Coach-Al-Mitchell-Mikaela-Mayer-Seems-Destined-for-Stardom
Featured Articles6 days ago

Forged by Longtime Coach Al Mitchell, Mikaela Mayer Seems Destined for Stardom

What-Next-for-Gabriel-Rosado
Featured Articles2 days ago

What Next for Gabriel Rosado?

The-Fallout-from-Floyd-Mayweather's-Exhibition-With-Logan-Paul
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

The Fallout from Floyd Mayweather’s Exhibition With Logan Paul

Fast-Results-from-LA-Nonito-Donaire-Reaffirms-His-Greatness-KOs-Oubaali
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Fast Results from LA: Nonito Donaire Reaffirms His Greatness, KOs Oubaali

Thompson-Fights-Dutchover-Wins-and-Other-Results
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Thompson Fights – Dutchover Wins and Other Results

Big-Banger-David-Lemieux-Forges-Another-KO-in-a-Stay-Busy-Fight-in-Mexico
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Big Banger David Lemieux Forges Another KO in a Stay-Busy Fight in Mexico

British-Boxing-Writer-Tris-Dixon-Has-Authored-a-Long-Overdue-Book
Book Review3 weeks ago

British Boxing Writer Tris Dixon Has Authored a Long-Overdue Book

Boxing-Odds-and-Ends-Fury-Wilder-III-Particulars-Kirkland-Laing-and-More
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Boxing Odds and Ends: Fury-Wilder III Particulars, Kirkland Laing and More

Avila-Perspective-Chap-139-The-Return-of-the-Club-Circuit-Shakur-and-More
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 139: The Return of the Club Circuit, Shakur and More

PFP-Rankings-A-Snapshot-in-Time-June-10-2021
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

PFP Ratings – A Snapshot in Time June 10, 2021  

Marco-Antonio-Barrera-and-More-at-the-First-SoCal-Club-Show-in-More-than-a-Year
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Marco Antonio Barrera and More at the First SoCal Club Show in More Than a Year

A-Big-Bump-in-Public-Esteem-Awaits-Shane-Mosley-Jr-if-he-Prevails-on-Saturday
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

A Big Bump in Public Esteem Awaits Shane Mosley Jr if he Prevails on Saturday

Three-Pros-Are-Joining-the-U.S.-Olympic-Boxing-Team-Ruffling-Some-Feathers
Featured Articles1 week ago

Three Pros are Joining the U.S. Olympic Boxing Team, Ruffling Some Feathers

Mayweather-Forced-to-go-the-Route-on-a-Befittingly-Wet-Night-in-Miami
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Mayweather Forced to Go the Distance on a Befittingly Wet Night in Miami

Result-from-Europe-Dubois-Blasts-Out-Dinu-Kabayel-UD-12-Johnson
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Results from Europe: Dubois Blasts Out Dinu; Kabayel UD 12 Johnson

Dan-Parker-Bashed-the-Bad-Guys-in-Boxing-and-Earned-a-Ticket-to-the-Hall-of-Fame
Featured Articles23 hours ago

Dan Parker Bashed the Bad Guys in Boxing and Earned a Ticket to the Hall of Fame

What-Next-for-Gabriel-Rosado
Featured Articles2 days ago

What Next for Gabriel Rosado?

Fast-Results-from-Las-Vegas-Inoue-Demolishes-Dasmarinas-Mayer-UD-Farias
Featured Articles5 days ago

Fast Results from Las Vegas: Inoue Demolishes Dasmarinas; Mayer UD Farias

Munguia-and-Rosado-Win-by-Stoppage-in-El-Paso-Rosado-in-Spectacular-Fashion
Featured Articles5 days ago

Munguia and Rosado Win by Stoppage in El Paso; Rosado in a Spectacular Fashion

Forged-by-Longtime-Coach-Al-Mitchell-Mikaela-Mayer-Seems-Destined-for-Stardom
Featured Articles6 days ago

Forged by Longtime Coach Al Mitchell, Mikaela Mayer Seems Destined for Stardom

Every-Joe-Gans-Lightweight-Title-Fight-Part-5-Kid-McPartland
Featured Articles6 days ago

Every Joe Gans Lightweight Title Fight – Part 5: Kid McPartland

Avila-Perspective-Chap-140-A-Warning-to-Prizefighters-and-More
Featured Articles7 days ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 140: A Warning to Prizefighters and More

Tyson-Fury-Roared-and-Deontay-Wilder-Remained-Silent-at-their-LA-Presser
Featured Articles1 week ago

Tyson Fury Roared and Deontay Wilder Remained Silent at their L.A. Presser

Tokyo-Bound-Aussie-Heavyweight-Justis-Huni-Stops-Rugged-Paul-Gallen-in-the-10th
Featured Articles1 week ago

Tokyo-Bound Aussie Heavyweight Justis Huni Stops Rugged Paul Gallen in the 10th

Three-Pros-Are-Joining-the-U.S.-Olympic-Boxing-Team-Ruffling-Some-Feathers
Featured Articles1 week ago

Three Pros are Joining the U.S. Olympic Boxing Team, Ruffling Some Feathers

Fast-Results-from-Las-Vegas-Shakur-Wins-a-Snoozer-Pedraza-Stops-Rodriguez
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Fast Results from Las Vegas: Shakur Wins a Snoozer; Pedraza Stops Rodriguez

Marco-Antonio-Barrera-and-More-at-the-First-SoCal-Club-Show-in-More-than-a-Year
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Marco Antonio Barrera and More at the First SoCal Club Show in More Than a Year

Boxing-Odds-and-Ends-Fury-Wilder-III-Particulars-Kirkland-Laing-and-More
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Boxing Odds and Ends: Fury-Wilder III Particulars, Kirkland Laing and More

Avila-Perspective-Chap-139-The-Return-of-the-Club-Circuit-Shakur-and-More
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 139: The Return of the Club Circuit, Shakur and More

PFP-Rankings-A-Snapshot-in-Time-June-10-2021
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

PFP Ratings – A Snapshot in Time June 10, 2021  

Every-Joe-Gans-Lightweight-Title-Fight-Part-4-Rufe-Turner
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Every Joe Gans Lightweight Title Fight – Part 4: Rufe Turner

The-Fallout-from-Floyd-Mayweather's-Exhibition-With-Logan-Paul
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

The Fallout from Floyd Mayweather’s Exhibition With Logan Paul

Mayweather-Forced-to-go-the-Route-on-a-Befittingly-Wet-Night-in-Miami
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Mayweather Forced to Go the Distance on a Befittingly Wet Night in Miami

Thompson-Fights-Dutchover-Wins-and-Other-Results
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Thompson Fights – Dutchover Wins and Other Results

Result-from-Europe-Dubois-Blasts-Out-Dinu-Kabayel-UD-12-Johnson
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Results from Europe: Dubois Blasts Out Dinu; Kabayel UD 12 Johnson

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Advertisement