Connect with us

Featured Articles

COMMISSIONER’S CORNER: On Judging Missteps, Algieri’s Deep Cut, More

Published

on

Let’s get one thing straight: The decision rendered on the Canelo Alvarez-Erislandy Lara fight was not fixed or pre-ordained, as so many of you have told me through your calls, your texts, your e-mails, your messages and your tweets.

Canelo Alvarez-Erislandy Lara. This is the perfect example of why it’s so hard, so difficult, to score a fight. Read each post here on TSS in reaction to the fight. Read ’em carefully. Some of you thought Lara won convincingly (as did I & judge Dave Moretti). Some of you thought Canelo won (as did judges Levi Martinez & Jerry Roth).

Some of you were so turned off by Lara’s fight plan that you’ve placed him on your “Don’t Watch” list, along with Richar Abril and Guillermo Rigondeaux (quite possibly the world’s most-gifted boxer!).

This was a bit like Chris Algieri v Ruslan Provodnikov. A boxer/mover/elusive competitor vs the constantly coming in, power-punching foe.

Half of us saw the aggressive power-puncher winning in both fights–Provodnikov/Alvarez. Some saw the elusive boxer winning (Algieri/Lara).

That’s boxing. That’s why the scores of the three officials read the way they did. They weren’t like that because of incompetence or dishonesty, which a few of my e-mails & texts claimed (“Well, looks like Golden Boy got to two of the judges” read one of my texts). That just wasn’t the case.

At the final bell, I was thinking Lara won by split decision, but really felt it should be unanimous. I saw him land the greater frequency of shots, while Alvarez’ hardest punches landed on nothing but the MGM Grand Ballroom’s air. Several of his body hooks got in. Many more were blocked. Sure, Lara was landing what many of you saw as “pitty-pat” punches, but Alvarez didn’t come into the ring with that swelling under his right eye.

I don’t agree with the decision.

But I am not going to go crazy and holler robbery or fix.

That’s boxing and that’s scoring.

You want to talk about controversial endings? Try a few of these bouts:

Tyrone Everett vs. Alfredo Escalera…

Pernell Whitaker vs. Jose Luis Ramirez…

Pernell Whitaker vs. Julio Cesar Chavez…

Those were three of the biggest robberies I have seen in boxing. How about Timothy Bradley vs Manny Pacquiao I? They still haven’t cleared the stench from the Las Vegas air from that one.

But that first one on my list–Everett-Escalera…that may be the WORST decision in the history of boxing. I was there that night. My card had it 12-3 for the undefeated southpaw slickster from Philadelphia. Boxing writer Jack “KO-JO” Obermayer, who has been to more boxing events than perhaps anyone else, said, “I believe I had it 12-1-2 for TE. He may have even won all 15 rounds.”

You saw it your way. The judges saw it their way.

I saw it my way.

***

Speaking of Chris Algieri, the red-hot Huntington, L.I. jr. welter has signed to face Manny Pacquiao on November 22 in Macau, China. Opening lines have Pacquiao an overwhelming favorite, much in the way of how heavily-favored Mike Tyson was going into his title defense against Buster Douglas in 1990. Manny is not getting and younger or any better. A prospective, mind-boggling super fight between Pacquiao and $$$May is yesterday’s news and no longer a reality, no matter how much many of us still want to see it. So, now it’s Pacquiao vs. Algieri. Unless I see something along the way which will change my mind, I think Algieri stands on the precipice of his second straight major upset–his first being against Ruslan Provodnikov a few months ago. A victory in Macau will unquestionably make him 2014’s “Fighter of the Year.” You’re not gonna’ buy the fight, you say? You may regret that move the next morning! I know. Most of you–I would say 95%–are reading this and saying “Commish, you’re nuts to tthink Algieri even has a miniscule chance of beating Pacquiao.” Algieri showed his fighting heart and courage against Provodnikov. Pacquiao is going to see nothing less.

A HUGE CUT–Cutmen are a dime a dozen, but top-notch ones are rare. Big George Mitchell, who, at 6’10” is the tallest cutman in the world, is also regarded as one of the best. He is one of the top-notch guys. Mitchell, a former NYC police officer, trained for years under one of the finest, most-respected cutmen of all time, Al Gavin. Fighters train to win championships. Trainers dream of working with and training a world champion. Managers clamor to work with a world champ. Cutmen ply their trade in the hope that one day they’ll be able to work the corner of a champion. Mitchell got his dream in May, when he worked the corner of Chris Algieri, whom he had been working with for a long time. As you may recall, Algieri was dropped in the first round by a powerful left hook. When he arose from the knockdown, a puffiness was already under Algieri’s eye. Later, a cut opened above the eye. Mitchell did his best to stem the flow of blood and control the swelling. It was something he needed to do from the end of the first round until the final bell. From press row, it looked as if Mitchell did a super job. His handiwork was examined by the extremely squeamish NYSAC doctors and approved. They allowed the fight to continue. Algieri showed tremendous heart by hanging in and winning a split decision. Now, as the announcement has come that Algieri has been rewarded with a fight against Manny Pacquiao for over $1 million, he has elected to let Big George go. It is not known the reason for Mitchell’s dismissal. Perhaps he asked for a lot more money from Algieri. Perhaps Algieri was unhappy with the work Mitchell did in the Provodnikov fight, although we can’t understand what there was to be unhappy about. In any event, Mitchell has been cut by Algieri. It’s a shame, because, while Algieri and his team get to earn their greatest payday, the man so responsible for helping Algieri get there won’t be there to earn his own payday. Somebody else will. It’s certainly the largest cut–even larger than the one which Algieri suffered against Provodnikov and the one which Mitchell kept under control–that Big George has ever had to face.

***

WHO WILL REF?: As of this writing, there has been no announcement from the NYSAC who will be the officials for Saturday’s WBO Middleweight Title fight between Gennady Golovkin and Daniel Geale. In recent years, the NYSAC has moved away from exclusively using New York State officials. Chairperson Melvina Lathan has been doing that for years, and now, new Executive Director David Berlin, has begun his time in office by using non-NY residents. For the Miguel Cotto-Sergio Martinez fight, his first major show, Berlin brought in Canadian Michael Griffin. This did not sit well with many New York State referees, who began whispering, “Why didn’t Berlin use a New York State ref?” There are plenty of world-class ones to choose from. Charlie Fitch is one (although we hear he will be working on a Showtime card from the Turning Stone Casino the night before)…Ron Lipton is another. There’s also Eddie Claudio. And Steve Willis. There are more. My guess is that for the two feature fights this weekend at MSG–GGG-Geale and Jennings-Perez–Berlin will select Benji Esteves and Harvey Dock. While both are residents of New Jersey, each has found a home in New York rings and each does excellent work. Hopefully, Berlin refrains from using another particular out-of-state ref, but that’s an issue which will be addressed if and when Berlin gives him a call for GGG-Geale or Jennings-Perez

THE HARDER THEY FALL: Until 2011, El Paso heavyweight David Rodriguez was cruising along, slowly but surely, in his boxing career. He was 34 and unbeaten in 36 fights. He, his handlers and his fans believed he had the power and skills to win at least a portion of the heavyweight title. Then, he was slashed on the fight by a knife in a street fight. It took him two years to recover and return to the ring.

“I was in the wrong place at the wrong time,” Rodriguez had told me about the knife attack on my SiriusXM show last December, one week before his comeback fight against veteran Darnell Boone. The veteran brought a very opponent-like record of 24-17-3 into the fight against Rodriguez’ 36-0 (34 KO’s). The veteran battered and stopped Rodriguez in the sixth round.

Rodriguez licked his wounds, rested for awhile, the headed back to the gym. This past weekend, he launched yet another comeback, against another veteran. Ironically, this veteran–Raymond Ochieng–had the identical record of Rodriguez’ last opponent, Darnell Boone. Their knockout totals virtually matched, too. Boone came in with 20 knockouts. Ochieng came in with 19. It was eerily similar. Perhaps it was an omen of things to come. The only thing is, Ochieng didn’t stop Rodriguez in the sixth round. He stopped him midway through the first.

For David Rodriguez, his dream of winning the heavyweight title ended in the fight against Ochieng. Perhaps it ended last December, against Boone. Perhaps it ended two years earlier, when the knife slashed across Rodriguez’ face. In any case, it ended.

David Rodriguez announced his retirement after the fight.

***

TIME FOR THE CALL: It’s time to put the name Al Gavin on the ballot for selection into the International Boxing Hall of Fame. Al Gavin was a cutman/cornerman/trainer par excellence who was visible in so many corners during the 70’s, 80’s 90’s and into the new millennium. Gavin worked the corner of amateurs, pro and celebrities. He worked with the best (Lennox Lewis), the busiest (Micky Ward) and the worst (me). He treated everybody like a champ. Gavin passed away in 2009. Ralph Citro, also a great cutman, was inducted in 2001. It’s time to put Al Gavin’s name on the ballot and put his selection into boxing immortality in the hands of lthe Boxing Writer’s Association. It really is time.

***

NEXT FOR MIGUEL COTTO: Winning the middleweight title from Sergio Martinez was merely another step towards Canastota for Miguel Cotto. Chances are, no matter what he does between now and his eventual induction will not affect his selection into the IBHOF. Two names being tossed around as possibly opponents for Cotto are Canelo Alvarez and Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. With Alvarez possibly going in the direction of James Kirkland and Julio Sr. saying his son will gladly make 160 to face Cotto, expect to see a middleweight title clash between Cotto and Chavez. Does this one head to New York or Las Vegas? I say it winds up in Cotto’s adopted home of New York City.

***

HE’S COMING BACK: He was battered and overpowered by Miguel Cotto on June 7 at Madison Square Garden. A bum knee and a surgically-repaired shoulder left Sergio Martinez looking like anything but a champion, and he was stopped in 10 one-sided rounds. Now, only a month later comes news from Spain–Martinez’ home–that the ex-middleweight king intends to fight on.

“He is 100% healthy and will resume his career with the intention of regaining the title,” said Sampson Lewkowicz, Martinez’ adviser.

One hundred percent healthy? How can that be? Only one month ago, Martinez looked like a cripple. He looked frail and weak and was treated as such by Cotto, who dropped him four times on the way to taking his title. How can he be 100% just a little over a month later?

“He said he feels fine,” said Martinez’ promoter Lou DiBella. “He’ll be coming into New York for a battery of physical exams and we will take it from there. My guess is he’ll be fighting in the early part of 2015 against a tough, top-15, top-20 opponent. We’ll take it from there.”

Martinez will be 40 in February.

***

VAST IMPROVEMENT: After watching Zou Shiming thoroughly outbox veteran Luis De la Rosa on Saturday night, you can see his hard work with Freddie Roach paying off. Shiming is planting his feet a lot more when he throws his blistering combinations and his movement is much more fluid with less wasted energy. Shiming won nine of the 10 rounds against De la Rosa to go 5-0 in a fight for the vacant WBO International Flyweight Title. There will probably be one more fight for Shiming before the 33-year-old Shiming–a hero throughout China–is put into a world title fight…On the same card as Shiming, Guillermo Rigondeaux moved to 14-0 with a second-round stoppage of Thailand’s Sod Kokietgym. It’s too bad the fight ended the way it did, on a cheap–but legal–punch by Rigondeaux. Kokietgym had come into the fight with a 63-2-1 record, with his only two losses coming to Daniel “Ponce” De Leon, the last one in 2006…Patrick Day, the sensational middleweight prospect from Long Island, will see action this Wednesday at B. B. King’s in NYC on a Lou DiBella card. Day is currently 7-0-1 with four knockouts.

A CHANGE IN THE RATINGS: With Top-10 PxP fighter GGG in action this weekend, I am wondering how he will look and if his performance will raise him, keep him the same or drop him in our PxP ratings. Guess we’ll find out on Saturday. My pick is GGG by late round stoppage.

WATCH RELATED VIDEOS ON BOXINGCHANNEL.TV

Share The Sweet Science experience!

Featured Articles

A Conversation with Legendary Phoenix Boxing Writer Norm Frauenheim

Published

on

A-Conversation-with-Legendary-Phoenix-Boxing-Writer-Norm Frauenheim

It seems all along that Norm Frauenheim was destined to become a boxing writer.

Two critical elements were at play that led the 75-year-old scribe to that profession.

“I was always interested in boxing, even as a kid,” said Frauenheim who spent 31 years with the Arizona Republic beginning in 1977. “I’m an Army brat. I was born in January 1949 on a base, Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, a city I didn’t really see until I hit the NBA road covering the [Phoenix] Suns for more than a decade starting in 1979-80.”

Frauenheim, a longtime correspondent for The Ring magazine who writes for various boxing sites such as boxingscene.com and 15rounds.com, added more background: “One of the many places I lived was Schofield Barracks on the Hawaiian Island of Oahu from 1962 to 1966,” he continued. “I delivered The Stars & Stripes to troops with the 25th Infantry Division, which was headed to Vietnam, along with my dad.

“Anyway, boxing and Schofield have long been linked, mostly because of a novel and film, ‘From Here to Eternity’ (the James Jones novel starring Frank Sinatra on the big screen). The troops were still boxing, outdoors, at the barracks along my newspaper route. I was 13 to 17 years old. I’d stop, watch and get interested. I’ve been interested ever since.”

Frauenheim added: “From there, my father and family shipped to Fort Sheridan, then a base north of Chicago where I spent one year and graduated from high school. Then my dad went back to Vietnam and I went to Vanderbilt University in Nashville (1967 through 1971) and graduated with a major in history. I was also a competitive swimmer, pre-Title IX.

“Competitive swimming is also at the roots of my sportswriting career. I was frustrated that Vanderbilt’s student newspaper didn’t cover us. I offered to do it. The newspaper agreed. I don’t swim as well as I used to. I look at a surfboard and look at the waves I used to take on and wondered what in the hell I was doing. It’s a lot safer to be at ringside.”

After a more than five-decade stint covering boxing, Frauenheim is glad that the manly sport is still around but with more outside competition.

“It’s surely not the [Muhammad] Ali era. It’s not the Golden 80s, either. It’s a fractured business in a world with more and more options for sports fans. MMA is just one example,” he said. “Boxing is not dying. It has been declared dead, ad nauseam. I read the inevitable obits and think of an old line: Boxing has climbed out of more coffins than Count Dracula.

“Still, the sport has been pushed to the fringe of public interest. But it’s been there before. Resiliency is one of its strongest qualities. It’ll be around, always reinventing itself.”

In some respects, boxing, like the other sports, has always been dependent on rivalries like the NBA’s Celtics versus Lakers, which drives the public’s interest and storylines.

“[Larry] Bird-Magic [Johnson] was basketball’s Ali-[Joe] Frazier,” Frauenheim says. “It transformed the league, setting the stage for Michael Jordan. It can happen again, in boxing or any other sport.”

Boxing is still the same but with tweaks here and there.

“When I started, championship bouts were 15 rounds instead of 12,” said Frauenheim who began his journalism career in 1970 at the Tallahassee Democrat and worked at the Jacksonville Journal before being lured in Phoenix. “There were morning weigh-ins instead of the day-before promotional show. There was also a lot more media. A big fight in Vegas meant all of the big media people were there. The last time that happened was Manny Pacquiao-Floyd Mayweather Jr. in 2015, a fight that failed to meet expectations and I think eroded much of the big media’s appetite for more,” continued Frauenheim whose byline has appeared in USA Today, the Los Angeles Times and the New York Times.

Mexican legend Saul Alvarez is still a major draw, but there are others on the horizon who are ready to step in and take over like the undefeated super middleweight David Benavidez.

“The clock is ticking on Canelo’s career, and I think he knows it. At this point, it’s about risk-reward. The 27-year-old Benavidez is too big a risk. Canelo, I think, looks at Benavidez and thinks he’ll beat him. I don’t think he would,” Frauenheim noted. “Benavidez is too big, has a mean streak and possesses a rare extra gear. He gets stronger in the late rounds.

“Even if Canelo wins, there’s a pretty good chance that Benavidez hurts him. There’s still a chance Canelo-Benavidez happens. But I think it’ll take some Saudi [Arabian] money.”

Boxers stand alone in the ring, literally and figuratively, but have a small supporting crew.

This makes them unique compared to baseball, football, basketball and hockey.

“Boxers are different from any other athlete I’ve ever covered. It’s why, I guess, boxing has been called a writer’s sport. There are plenty of NFL and NBA players who have grown up on the so-called mean streets,” Frauenheim said. “But they have teammates. They don’t make that long, lonely walk from the dressing room to the ring.”

Stripped naked, boxers are an open book, according to Frauenheim.

“They can be hard to deal with while training and cutting weight. But after a fight, no athlete in my experience is more forthcoming,” he said. “Win or lose, they just walked through harm’s way in front of people. In my experience, that’s when they want to talk.”

Selecting a career highlight or highlights isn’t easy for Frauenheim, but he tried.

“There are so many. I was there for the great Sugar Ray Leonard victory over Thomas Hearns [1981], a welterweight classic,” he recalled. “A personal favorite was Michael Carbajal’s comeback from two knockdowns for a KO of Humberto Gonzalez in 1993, perhaps the best fight in the history of the lightest weight class. I was also there for the crazy, including Mike Tyson-Evander Holyfield’s “Bite Fight” and the “Fan Man” landing in the ring like the 82nd Airborne Division midway through a Riddick Bowe-Holyfield fight behind Vegas’ Caesars Palace.”

Three boxers set the tone and backdrop for Frauenheim’s illustrious tenure as a writer.

“Roberto Duran is the greatest lightweight ever. His lifestyle sometimes got the best of him. That was evident in his infamous ‘No Mas’ welterweight loss to Sugar Ray Leonard in New Orleans,” he said of that November 1980 bout. “He told me that he took the rematch, on short notice, because of the money. “Women-women-women, eating-eating-eating, drinking-drinking-drinking,” he told me in an interview of what he had been doing before Leonard’s people approached him for an immediate rematch of his Montreal victory. But take a look at Duran’s victory in Montreal [June 1980]. Watch it again. On that night, there’s never been a better fighter than Duran.”

Frauenheim added another titan to that short list: “Leonard, who is the last real Sugar,” he said, and ended with the only eight-weight division king. “Manny Pacquiao, an amazing story about a starving kid off impoverished Filipino streets. He was a terrific fighter, blessed with speed, power and instinct. Add to that a shy personality unchanged by all the money and celebrity. He is an example of what can still happen in boxing. He’s the face of the game’s resiliency.”

That’s quite a trio, and they’re the best of the best that Frauenheim’s seen and covered from ringside.

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Share The Sweet Science experience!
Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Aaron McKenna and Kieron Conway Victorious in Osaka

Published

on

Aaron-McKenna-and-Kieran-Conway-Victorious-in-Osaka

Aaron McKenna scored a 10th-round stoppage of Jeovanny Estela today (Monday, July 15) in Osaka, Japan. The bout was one of four scheduled 10-rounders in the middleweight division in a revamped Prizefighter Tournament with a $1,000,000 prize at stake for the winner.

One of two fighting brothers from the little town of Smithborough in County Monaghan, Ireland, the undefeated (19-0, 10 KOs) McKenna (pictured) was well ahead on the scorecards when the referee stepped in and halted the match at the 2:02 mark of the final round. He entered the ring a 4/1 favorite over Estela (14-1), a 23-year-old Floridian of Puerto Rican descent who began his pro career at 147.

McKenna’s opponent in the next round (at a date and place to be determined) will be England’s Kieron Conway (21-3-1, 6 KOs) who scored a seventh-round stoppage over China’s obscure Ainiwaer Yilixati (19-2). All three of Conway’s losses were to opponents who were undefeated when he fought them with two of those setbacks occurring on Canelo Alvarez undercards.

Two Japanese fighters – Riku Kunimoto and Kazuto Takesako – were victorious in the other bouts and will meet in the semifinals.

Local fan favorite Kunimoto, recognized as the middleweight champion of Japan, advanced to 12-1 (6 KOs) with a fifth-round stoppage of countryman Eiki Kani (8-5-3). This was a rematch. The two fought earlier this year in Nagoya with Kunimoto registering a fifth-round TKO.

Takesako (17-2-1, 15 KOs) registered the lone upset on the card with a hard-earned decision over England’s Mark Dickinson. It was the first pro loss for Dickinson who had only six pro fights under his belt but was a highly decorated amateur. The scores were 98-92, 97-93, and 95-94.

The next fight for Kunimoto will be another rematch. Takesako saddled him with his lone defeat, knocking him out in the first round at Tokyo’s venerable Korakuen Hall in May of 2021.

The tournament, co-sponsored by Matchroom and televised on DAZN, offers an aggregate $100,000 per event for knockouts. McKenna, Conway, and Kunimoto scooped up $25,000 apiece.

Aaron McKenna, his brother Stephen, and their father/trainer Feargal McKenna were the subjects of a story that ran on these pages. Stephen McKenna (14-0, 13 KOs) returns to the ring next month against 14-2 Joe Laws on a BOXXER promotion that will air on Sky Sports in the UK.

Aaron McKenna entered the Prizefighter Tourney as the pre-fight favorite and Matchroom honcho Eddie Hearn has indicated that he will be in line for a world title shot if he wins his next two matches.

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Share The Sweet Science experience!
Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Results and Recaps from Philly where ‘Boots’ Ennis Stomped Out David Avanesyan

Published

on

Results-and-Recaps-from-Philly-where-Boots-Ennis-Stomped-Out-David-Avanesyan

PHILADELPHIA, PA — On what Matchroom Boxing Promotions called the most important night in Philadelphia boxing in over 40 years, Jaron “Boots” Ennis (32-0, 29 KOs), the current IBF welterweight champion from the city of Brotherly Love, attracted a larger-than-expected crowd of 14,119 to the Wells Fargo Center where he stopped David Avanesyan who was pulled out after five rounds. In Avanesyan (30-5-1, 18 KOs), Ennis looked to impress on two fronts, both commercially and critically.

It didn’t take long for there to be some excitement after Ennis landed a clean jab that caused Avanesyan to stagger momentarily. Ennis turned southpaw and the action stopped after Ennis landed a low blow. Rounds two and three saw both fighters decide to fight on the inside. Ennis was able to land crisp upper cuts while only getting hit with a few shots in exchange. After four rounds, the evidence was clear that Avanesyan was getting hit with clean shots as his face started to get busted up. Avanesyan had a moment when he landed a right hand that got the attention of the crowd and Ennis.

In return, Ennis continued to press forward, this time behind a straight left and combinations. A huge overhand left floored Avanesyan who rose to his feet. Round five ended with Ennis landing some clean power shots that had Avanesyan looking deflated. The ringside physician called an end to the fight after the conclusion of round five.

After the fight, Ennis agreed that he would love the opportunity to fight Terence Crawford if Crawford were to win next month, this despite not having the type of performance that he would have loved to have had after having a year-long lay-off. Eddie Hearn mentioned that he would love to have Ennis return to Philadelphia sometime in October or November if the Crawford fight can’t be made in a possible unification fight.

Other Bouts

After three pedestrian rounds, what sounded like it would be a grudge match between Jahlil Hackett (9-0, 7 KOs) and Pete Dobson (16-2) finally turned into a fight in the fourth. With both fighters finally warming up, Hackett used his jab to continue to work his way inside to land power combinations. Dobson was forced to back up into the ropes and take shots after a large lump formed on his forehead above his left eye.

The action settled down after the sixth round with Hackett taking total control. He continued to work behind an educated jab that stunted any offensive attack that Dobson tried to muster. After all ten rounds, two of the judges saw the fight 97-93, while the third had it 96-94 all in favor of Jahlil Hackett.

Skye Nicolson (11-0, 1 KO), the 2020 Tokyo Olympian and current WBC featherweight champion, utilized her skills in every way to defeat Dayan Vargas (18-2, 12 KOs). All three judges scored the fight 100-90 after Nicolson completed the shutout in dominating fashion through her command of range with a sharp jab and lateral movement. Moving forward unification fights and a possible move up in weight may force Nicolson to face the type of opposition that could make for more entertaining fights in the future.

Light heavyweight action kicked off the main portion of the DAZN telecast. Jersey City native Khalil Coe (9-0-1, 7 KOs) made short work of Kwame Ritter (11-2). After an uneventful first round, Coe started to close the distance to start the second round and as a result he landed a hard straight right that hurt Ritter. A left hook dropped Ritter and he fell backwards into the ropes. When he got up, Coe was able to swarm him with hard shots and the referee called a halt to the action with just one second remaining in the second round.

Former world title challenger Christopher “Pitufu” Diaz (29-4, 19 KOs) made quick work of the game but clearly overmatched Derlyn Hernandez (12-2-1). A short-left hook hurt Hernandez and the seasoned Diaz took his time applying the follow-up pressure that forced the referee to wave off the action at the 2:36 mark of the second round. Diaz stated prior to this comeback fight that he’s looking for one more run towards a world title.

Christian Carto (23-1, 17 KO’s) looked impressive in three rounds of action against Carlos Buitrago (38-14, 22 KOs). Both fighters were happy to exchange from the opening bell. Carto took the punches he was hit with well and was able to return fire with combinations that caught and dropped Buitrago to start round three. A series of well-placed power combinations hurt Buitrago as the round came to an end, which prompted the referee to stop the bout at the end of the round.

A pair of Boots Promotions fighters kicked off the night with entertaining bouts:

It took all six rounds to decide the Ismail Muhammad (5-0, 1 KOs) Frank Brown (3-5-2) fight. Brown pressed the action early and caught the cold Muhammad in an exchange knocking him down for the first time in his career. Muhammad rose to his feet and proceeded to work the gameplan to get himself back into the fight. Muhammad scored his own knockdown in the fourth round and finished the fight strong to earn the unanimous decision victory by scores of 58-54 twice and 57-55.

Dennis Thompson (1-0) won his professional debut at bantamweight with a unanimous decision over the game Fernando Valdez (1-8).

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Share The Sweet Science experience!
Continue Reading
Advertisement
The-Hauser-Report-Ryan-Garcia-and-the-New-York-State-Athletic-Commission
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

The Hauser Report: Ryan Garcia and the New York State Athletic Commission

Middleweight-Title-Fight-Cancelled-Super-Wekterweight-Sizzler-Announced-by-Golden-Boy
Featured Articles5 days ago

Middleweight Title Fight Canceled; Super Welterweight Sizzler Announced by Golden Boy

Mascot 1
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Abraham Nova and his Mascot are Back in Action on Friday Night

Rodriguez-vs-Estrada-A-Closer-Look-at-Saturday's-Dream-Match-Up -in-Phoenix
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Rodriguez vs. Estrada: A Closer Look at Saturday’s Dream Match-up in Phoenix 

Angelo-Leo's-Homecoming-Fight-in-Albuquerque-was-Fermented-on-ProBox
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Angelo Leo’s Homecoming Fight in Albuquerque was Fermented on ProBox

Will-Eumor-Marcial-be-the-First-Filipino-Boxer-to-win-an-Olympic-Gold-Medal?
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Will Eumir Marcial be the First Filipino Boxer to Win an Olympic Gold Medal?

A-Pearl-from-the-Boxing-Vault-Fritzie-Zivnic-Will-See-You-Now
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

A Pearl from the Boxing Vault: Fritzie Zivic Will See You Now 

Results-from-Las-Vegas-where-Rafael-Espinoza-Reyained-his-WBO-Belt-in-Grand-Style
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Results from Las Vegas where Rafael Espinoza Retained his WBO Title in Grand Style

Jesse-'Bam'-Rodriguez-is-the-Boss-at-115,but-Don't Sleep-on-Ioka-vs-Martinez
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Jesse ‘Bam’ Rodriguez is the Boss at 115, but Don’t Sleep on Ioka vs Martinez

Shakur-Improves-ro-22-0-and-Christmas-Comes-Early-for-Conceicao-in-Newark
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Shakur Improves to 22-0 and Christmas Comes Early for Conceicao in Newark

Results-and-Recaps-from-Philly-where-Boots-Ennis-Stomped-Out-David-Avanesyan
Featured Articles4 days ago

Results and Recaps from Philly where ‘Boots’ Ennis Stomped Out David Avanesyan

Results-and-Recaps-where Teofimo-Lopez-Outlcassed Steve
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Results & Recaps from Miami where Teofimo Lopez Out-Classed Steve Claggett

Jesse-Rodriguez-KOs-Juan-Francisco-Estrada-Before-a-Roaring-Crowd-in-Phoenix
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Jesse Rodriguez KOs Juan Francisco Estrada Before a Roaring Crowd in Phoenix

Denny-and-Crocker-Win-in-Birmingham-Catterall-vs-Prograis-a-Go-for-Aug-24
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Denny and Crocker Win in Birmingham: Catterall vs Prograis a Go for Aug. 24

Trevor-McCumby-Fell-Off-the-Map-and-Now-He's-Back-with-a-Big-Fight-on-the-Horizon
Featured Articles1 week ago

Trevor McCumby Fell Off the Map and Now He’s Back with a Big Fight on the Horizon

fulghum
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Kalkreuth and Fulghum Score Uninspired Wins over Late Subs at Fantasy Springs

Lamont-Roach-TKOs-Teak-Tough-Feargal-NcCrory-in-a-Homecoming-Title-Defense
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Lamont Roach TKOs Teak-Tough Feargal McCrory in a Homecoming Title Defense

U.S.-Olympic-Gold-Medalist-Fidel-La-Barna-Was-a-Phenom-After-a-Rocky-Start
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

U.S. Olympic Gold Medalist Fidel La Barba Was a Phenom After a Rocky Start

Avila-Perspective-Chap-287-Boxing-Wars-on-Tap-in-Philadelphia-and-Las-Vegas
Featured Articles6 days ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 287: Boxing Wars on Tap in Philadelphia and Las Vegas

Shane-Mosley-Jr-Turns-Away-Daniel-Jacobs-in-the-Co-Feature-to-Masvidal-Diaz
Featured Articles1 week ago

Shane Mosley Jr Turns Away Daniel Jacobs in the Co-Feature to Masvidal-Diaz

A-Conversation-with-Legendary-Phoenix-Boxing-Writer-Norm Frauenheim
Featured Articles1 day ago

A Conversation with Legendary Phoenix Boxing Writer Norm Frauenheim

Aaron-McKenna-and-Kieran-Conway-Victorious-in-Osaka
Featured Articles2 days ago

Aaron McKenna and Kieron Conway Victorious in Osaka

Results-and-Recaps-from-Philly-where-Boots-Ennis-Stomped-Out-David-Avanesyan
Featured Articles4 days ago

Results and Recaps from Philly where ‘Boots’ Ennis Stomped Out David Avanesyan

Muratalla-Nips-Farmer-and-Segawa-Upsets-Villa-on-a-Top-Rank-Card-in-Las-Vegas
Featured Articles4 days ago

Muratalla Nips Farmer and Segawa Upsets Villa on a Top Rank Card in Las Vegas

Chocolate 560x590
Featured Articles5 days ago

‘Chocolatito’ Gonzalez Delights the Home Folks: TKOs Barrera in 10

Middleweight-Title-Fight-Cancelled-Super-Wekterweight-Sizzler-Announced-by-Golden-Boy
Featured Articles5 days ago

Middleweight Title Fight Canceled; Super Welterweight Sizzler Announced by Golden Boy

Avila-Perspective-Chap-287-Boxing-Wars-on-Tap-in-Philadelphia-and-Las-Vegas
Featured Articles6 days ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 287: Boxing Wars on Tap in Philadelphia and Las Vegas

Trevor-McCumby-Fell-Off-the-Map-and-Now-He's-Back-with-a-Big-Fight-on-the-Horizon
Featured Articles1 week ago

Trevor McCumby Fell Off the Map and Now He’s Back with a Big Fight on the Horizon

Fernando-Martinez-Ratches-Up-the-Heat-in-the-Hot-Super-Flyweight-Division
Featured Articles1 week ago

Fernando Martinez Ratches Up the Heat in the Hot Super Flyweight Division

Shane-Mosley-Jr-Turns-Away-Daniel-Jacobs-in-the-Co-Feature-to-Masvidal-Diaz
Featured Articles1 week ago

Shane Mosley Jr Turns Away Daniel Jacobs in the Co-Feature to Masvidal-Diaz

Shakur-Improves-ro-22-0-and-Christmas-Comes-Early-for-Conceicao-in-Newark
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Shakur Improves to 22-0 and Christmas Comes Early for Conceicao in Newark

Results-and-Recaps-from-Ontario-Where-William-Zepeda-KOed-Giovanni-Cabrera
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Results and Recaps from Ontario Where William Zepeda KOed Giovanni Cabrera

Chalk-Up-Another-Quickie-for-the-Romford-Bull-Wipes-Out-Alen-Babic-in-36-Seconds
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Chalk Up Another Quickie for the ‘Romford Bull’: Wipes Out Alen Babic in 36 Seconds

Angelo-Leo's-Homecoming-Fight-in-Albuquerque-was-Fermented-on-ProBox
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Angelo Leo’s Homecoming Fight in Albuquerque was Fermented on ProBox

Jesse-'Bam'-Rodriguez-is-the-Boss-at-115,but-Don't Sleep-on-Ioka-vs-Martinez
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Jesse ‘Bam’ Rodriguez is the Boss at 115, but Don’t Sleep on Ioka vs Martinez

U.S.-Olympic-Gold-Medalist-Fidel-La-Barna-Was-a-Phenom-After-a-Rocky-Start
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

U.S. Olympic Gold Medalist Fidel La Barba Was a Phenom After a Rocky Start

Jesse-Rodriguez-KOs-Juan-Francisco-Estrada-Before-a-Roaring-Crowd-in-Phoenix
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Jesse Rodriguez KOs Juan Francisco Estrada Before a Roaring Crowd in Phoenix

Results-and-Recaps-where Teofimo-Lopez-Outlcassed Steve
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Results & Recaps from Miami where Teofimo Lopez Out-Classed Steve Claggett

Lamont-Roach-TKOs-Teak-Tough-Feargal-NcCrory-in-a-Homecoming-Title-Defense
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Lamont Roach TKOs Teak-Tough Feargal McCrory in a Homecoming Title Defense

fulghum
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Kalkreuth and Fulghum Score Uninspired Wins over Late Subs at Fantasy Springs

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Advertisement