Connect with us

Featured Articles

Sebastian Fundora is a Towering Inferno whose Money Punch Rises from the Furnace

Published

on

Sebastian-Fundora-is-a-Towering-Inferno-whose-Money-Punch-Rises-From-the-Furnace

His anatomical measurements alone almost certainly would stamp Sebastian “The Towering Inferno” Fundora as the most unusual super welterweight ever, but there are other spatial matters that help to identify the 24-year-old southpaw from Coachella, Calif., as something even more unique, and more dangerous, than standard-sized 154-pounders.

When Fundora  (19-0-1, 13 KOs) defends his  WBC interim super welter title Saturday night against rugged Mexican Carlos Ocampo (34-1, 22 KOs), in the PBC on Showtime main event at Dignity Health Sports Park in Carson, Calif., the matchup at first glance might suggest an NBA power forward posting up a point guard. Fundora is, depending on which listing you choose to believe, 6’5”, 6’5½” or 6’6”, but what’s a half-inch or so one way or the other when your opponent is 5’10½” and is giving away seven inches in reach to your condor-like wingspan of 80 inches?

Many fighters with physical advantages so seemingly apparent would opt to fight at a distance of their choosing, peppering the shorter man with boarding-house-reach jabs, the better to set up their own power shots while making it more difficult for the shorter guy to close the gap.

But Sebastian Fundora, who might be lean but hardly scrawny, does not fit anyone’s expectations other than his own and those of his Cuban-born father-trainer, Freddy Fundora. Jabs? The Fundoras know it’s necessary to have one as part of the overall package, but their preference is not to rely on it any more than is absolutely necessary. It is Sebastian’s signature shot, a ripping right uppercut thrown from tight quarters, that has elevated him to the position of mandatory WBC challenger to Jermell “Iron Man” Charlo (35-1-1, 19 KOs), the undisputed super welter champion. Fundora lives, breathes, eats and sleeps with that megafight in mind, but before it can happen, he has to take care of business against Ocampo, who comes in on a 12-bout winning streak and presumably confident he can find a way to get chin-to-chest with the Towering Inferno, if not nose-to-nose.

It was that uppercut, a very damaging blow from below, that has been the gift that keeps on giving to Sebastian Fundora. He delivered one to the chin of highly regarded Erickson Lubin in the third round of their April 9 bout in Las Vegas for the WBC interim super welter belt, sending Lubin to the canvas, and he closed round nine with a couple of more just before the bell, prompting Lubin’s corner to signal that their man had had enough and would not be coming out for the 10th.

But Lubin had his moments as well, most notably in the seventh when he landed several telling blows, causing a shaken Fundora to take a knee and give himself a few precious seconds to recover from the most precarious spot he’d been in as a pro to date.

“I had the composure to use my brain and take a knee during that fight,” Fundora said, apparently as pleased by his presence of mind at that moment as he is of his trademark uppercuts that eventually closed the show. “I got hit with a good punch and I was, like, `Let me take a little breather,’ instead of getting hit like that again. I used my intelligence.”

Ocampo, whose only loss came on a one-round knockout against IBF welterweight champion Errol Spence Jr. on June 16, 2018, thereafter moved up to super welter and launched his dozen-fight winning streak. He no doubt is envisioning doing unto Fundora what Lubin did, only more emphatically and ultimately victoriously. But there is a price to be paid for entering that toe-to-toe danger zone. When Fundora connects to maximum effect with his weapon of choice, and he usually does at some point in every fight, he feels the outcome is all but preordained.

“It goes up and their faces are usually right there,” he said of his lengthening list of victims. “It’s as easy as that. The uppercut is my lucky punch. It lands most of the time, with everybody. Southpaw. Right hand. It doesn’t matter. Once I (land) that, I feel like the job’s done.”

Sebastian Fundora is one of six siblings, all of whom have boxed at one time or another. His 20-year-old sister, Gabriela (8-0, 4 KOs), takes on Mexico’s Naomi Apellanos Reyes (9-1, 5 KOs) in the scheduled 10-round lead-in to her really big brother’s marquee bout. Gabriela is tall for a female flyweight (5’9”) and while not exactly towering, might reasonably be described as a high-rise inferno. She, too, has been tutored to make liberal use of the uppercut.

“We call it a `hot shot,’” Freddy Fundora said of the punch that could soon make Sebastian, if you’ll pardon the expression, the next big thing in boxing. “Most of the fighters he’ll be facing are going to be shorter than him, and they’ll be charging him. They pretty much fall into the uppercut all by themselves.”

Punch statistics furnished by CompuBox illustrate just how busy a bee Sebastian is, in a general sense, and how reliant he is on that uppercut. They also tell a tale of a jab that is so seldom employed that cobwebs could be growing on it, a juxtaposition of resources that, on the face of it, defies logic. The Towering Inferno averages 72.1 punches a round, second in his weight class only to Brian Castano (75.5), but he is first in punches landed per round (24.4), first in connect percentage (33.4%), first in power punches thrown per round (54.8) and first in power punches landed per round (22.4).

The pie chart also reveals that boxing’s version of a praying mantis throws only 18 jabs a round, lowest among all super welters, only two of which actually connect. For an especially tall fighter with an 80-inch reach, that paucity of use and effectiveness of the jab would seem to be anomalies.

Should Fundora get past Ocampo, the waiting period will commence for a Charlo-Fundora showdown, which could be the special event fight fans will be clamoring to see, much as they are now for the Spence-Terence Crawford full unification extravaganza that has been boxing’s most drawn-out tease since the five-year slow dance before Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao finally squared off. But it better happen sooner rather than later, because super welterweights as tall as Fundora are not guaranteed to remain in that weight class in the long term.

“Right now I’m comfortable at 154,”Fundora said. “But who knows? Maybe after this fight I’ll jump up to 168. We’ll see what happens in the next few years. I walk around at this weight. I don’t shoot up too heavy during my breaks. The heaviest I’ve been is, like, seven pounds over. Never anything crazy.”

Bernard Fernandez, named to the International Boxing Hall of Fame in the Observer category with the Class of 2020, was the recipient of numerous awards for writing excellence during his 28-year career as a sports writer for the Philadelphia Daily News. Fernandez’s first book, “Championship Rounds,” a compendium of previously published material, was released in May of last year. The sequel, “Championship Rounds, Round 2,” with a foreword by Jim Lampley, is currently out. The anthology can be ordered through Amazon.com and other book-selling websites and outlets.

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Featured Articles

Tyson Fury Returns on Saturday with a Familiar Foe in the Opposite Corner

Published

on

Tyson-Returns-on-Saturday-with-a-Familiar-Foe-in-the-Opposite-Corner

“Tyson Fury made a name for himself last night, one that already has a ready-made ring about it and will be destined to become familiar in boxing.” Alan Hubbard, a ringside correspondent for The (London) Examiner wrote those words after Fury wrested the British and Commonwealth heavyweight titles from Derek Chisora with a comprehensive 12-round decision on July 23, 2011.

Those words were prescient. Tyson Fury did go on to become a familiar name in the sport. Indeed, one could argue that at this moment in history no active boxer is more famous.

More than 11 full years have elapsed since Fury toppled Chisora. In the ensuing years, the Gypsy King outpointed Wladimir Klitschko in Germany to win the world heavyweight title, battled personal demons that sidelined him for two-and-half years, returned to the ring with a flourish, ultimately regaining the world heavyweight title, or at least a version of it, in the second chapter of his memorable trilogy with Deontay Wilder, and rising so high in the opinion of boxing enthusiasts that he would be favored over any other boxer on the planet.

Oh, and lest we forget, since defeating Chisora in 2011, Fury whipped Chisora again, stopping him after 10 one-sided frames in 2014. Fury’s eight-inch height advantage enabled him to control the distance vs. “Dell Boy” who was never knocked down but who absorbed a great deal of punishment before his chief second said, “no mas.”

A third meeting between Fury (32-0-1, 23 KOs) and the soon-to-be-39-year-old Chisora (33-12) would seem to be superfluous. Del Boy, coming off a narrow win over Kubrat Pulev, has lost three of his last four. But on Saturday, Dec. 3, they will go at it again. The venue is London’s Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, capacity 62,850, and by all indications, despite a chill in the air (the temperature is expected to hover around 40 degrees), there won’t be too many empty seats.

For promoter Frank Warren, Fury vs Chisora is Plan B – he was hoping to match Fury against Anthony Joshua – but he believes that Fury has become so popular that he can make a tidy profit no matter who is in the opposite corner. The Gypsy King, once referenced as the enfant terrible of British boxing, has toned down his rhetoric (one might say that he proactively distanced himself from Kanye West) and become almost cuddly, a source of inspiration for many Brits, the first member of the black sheep Traveler community about whom this could ever be said.

Fury, needless to say, is a heavy favorite. The odds are in the 25/1 range. The co-feature is likewise looked upon as a mismatch. Daniel Dubois, who shares the diluted WBA heavyweight title with Oleksandr Usyk, is a consensus 16/1 favorite over Kevin Lerena (28-1, 19 KOs) who rides in on a 17-fight winning streak. The six-foot-one Lerena carried a career-high 234 pounds for his last assignment against ancient Mariusz Wach, but the South African southpaw has fought most of his career as a cruiserweight.

The undercard includes featherweight Isaac Lowe, Tyson Fury’s bosom buddy, and Hosea Burton, Fury’s cousin, both of whom appear to be matched soft in scheduled six-rounders, plus 18-year-old phenom Royston Barney Smith in a 4-rounder against a transplanted Nicaraguan.

This is a pay-per-view event in the UK, but U.S. fight fans who subscribe to ESPN+ can see it for free. The ring walks for the main event are expected to go about 4 pm ET.

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

What Path will Yokasta Valle Choose Next?

Published

on

What-Path-will-Yokasta-Valle-Choose-Next?

After the recent controversial ruling that made her a world champion in three different divisions, the fans of the Costa Rican Yokasta Valle are wondering: What path will the successful boxer choose next?

On Saturday, November 26th, in a fight of continuous exchanges with the then undefeated Argentine Evelyn Bermúdez (17-1-1, 6 KOs), “Yoka” Valle (27-2, 9 KOs) came out with her arm raised at the Dignity Health Sports Park in Carson, California, where she won the IBF and WBO belts, which Bermúdez was defending for the seventh and second time, respectively.

Although the Costa Rican fighter (pictured on the right) went on the attack for practically the entire 10 rounds, the exchanges were even, give and take, with good moments for both fighters, which made it difficult to evaluate each round. Hence the discomfort of many fans, especially in the Bermúdez camp, with the card of judge Adalaide Byrd (99-91), which apparently had Bermúdez prevailing in only one round. Neither did Judge Daniel Sandoval’s card (97-93) represent what transpired in the ring, while Zachary Young’s score of 95-95 was more accurate, distributing five rounds for each combatant.

In the case of Byrd, she also received innumerable criticism in the first fight between Saúl “Canelo” Álvarez and Gennady “GGG” Golovkin, which was held in September 2017 at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas and which ended with a favorable scorecard for each boxer and another of 114-114.

At that time, Byrd had judged more than 400 fights over a 20-year span, and her discordant scorecard of 118-110 reflected Canelo winning 10 rounds and GGG only two (the fourth and the seventh). Dave Moretti leaned towards Golovkin (115-113), while Don Trella (114-114) saw it even.

CHAMPION IN THREE CATEGORIES

Born in Matagalpa, Nicaragua on August 28, 1992 and living in Costa Rica since her childhood, Valle made her boxing debut at the age of 22 in the light flyweight category. In that first experience at the pro level, she defeated Mexican María Guadalupe Gómez by unanimous decision in four rounds, on July 26, 2014, in Alajuela, Costa Rica.

Two years later, in her twelfth fight, she conquered the IBF title at 102 pounds by split decision against Ana Victoria Polo in San José, Costa Rica. In December 2017, Valle suffered her first professional failure against the local Naoko Fujioka, who won by unanimous decision at Korakuén Hall in Tokyo where they fought for the vacant WBO light flyweight belt.

Six months later, on June 16, 2018, Valle lost again by unanimous decision against German Christina Rupprecht (11-0-1, 3 KOs) in Munich, a duel that was for the WBO strawweight interim belt. Rupprecht maintains that belt and is again in Valle’s sights.

Following those two setbacks, “Yoka” Valle compiled 14 victories, including the one she obtained in Marbella against Spaniard Joana Pastrana in August 2019, which she won by split decision securing the IBF 105-pound belt.

More recently, on September 8th in Costa Rica, Valle became a two-division champion at 105 pounds, by unanimously prevailing (the three judges scored the fight 100-90) over Vietnamese Thi Thu Nhi Nguyen, who ceded the WBO title. And then with her success against Bermúdez last weekend, Valle made history in Costa Rican boxing by adding her third crown in three different divisions (102, 105 and 108 pounds).

WHERE WILL YOKASTA VALLE GO NEXT?

Valle, who now owns two light flyweight titles (IBF and WBO) could next go in search of unification with Mexican Jéssica Nery (WBA super champion) or with Canadian Kim Clavel, who holds the WBC title. (Clavel and Nery collide on Thursday in Laval, Quebec.)

However, a more viable option would be to return to 105 pounds and seek a fight with American Seniesa Estrada (23-0, 9 KOs), who maintains the WBA belt, or with Rupprecht, who remains unbeaten. That seemed to be Valle’s immediate objective, as she affirmed it in the ring after defeating Nguyen. In an indirect reference to Seniesa Estrada and Tina Rupprecht, Valle said “I want the belts. I’ve been saying it from the beginning, I want the WBC and WBA next, whoever has ’em.”

At Friday’s weigh-in for her fight with Bermúdez, Valle stated “I want to fight the best. I want to be undisputed. When Tina (Rupprecht) and Seniesa (Estrada) were not available, my team and I made the decision to move up in weight and challenge Evelyn for her world title belts. I have to fight. [MarvNation CEO] Marvin Rodriguez presented this fight to me. This is the type of fight I want. It is champion versus champion. I want to give the fans these types of fights.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: Kim Clavel caught the flu and pulled out on Wednesday just prior to the weigh-in. Her match with Jessica Nery was rescheduled for Jan. 13.

Photo credit: Tom Hogan / Hogan Photos

Article submitted by Jorge Juan Alvarez in Spanish

Please note any adjustments made for clarification purposes and any errors in translation were unintentional.

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading

Featured Articles

Regis Prograis Knocks Out José Zepeda and Clears the Way for José Ramírez

Published

on

Regis-Prograis-Knocks-Out-Jose-Zepeda-and-Clears-the-Way-for-Jose-Ramirez

American Regis Prograis had to wait three years and a month for the opportunity to hold a world crown once again. On Saturday, November 26, at the Dignity Health Sports Park, in Carson, California, Prograis faced José Zepeda for the vacant WBC junior welterweight belt. Prograis was victorious by applying chloroform to Zepeda in the eleventh round.

Previously, on October 26, 2019, Prograis (28-1, 24 KOs) had lost the WBA junior welterweight belt by majority decision to Scotsman Josh Taylor at the 02 Arena in England.

Since then, the thirty-three-year-old Prograis who is based in Houston, Texas has obtained four wins (including vs Zepeda), all before the limit, as proof of the devilish power of his powerful fists, especially the left one.

Prior to the duel with Zepeda (35-2, 27 KOs), most experts favored Prograis, who after winning the intense battle, recognized that it was the most demanding fight of his career. “That dude is tough, tough, tough. He came to fight, he probably gave me one of my hardest fights, I’m not even gonna lie,” said Prograis. “This dude is tough, bro. I’ve got so much respect for you. You prepared me to get this belt and hold this belt. I congratulate you. All the best to you, bro. Don’t stop, I feel like you can still be a world champion.”

Almost from the very beginning of the fight, Prograis showed greater speed with his hands and legs, and a general sense of technical superiority over Zepeda, who in the second round opened up a wound above his left eye with a legal blow.

From then on, Prograis’s strong impacts gradually undermined Zepeda’s resistance. Zepeda arrived totally exhausted in the eleventh round, where he received a straight left to the face, putting him in poor condition. A run with both fists from Prograis knocked him down and referee Ray Corona called the match with 59 seconds remaining in the round. This is the first setback that Zepeda has suffered by knockout in professional boxing.

On several occasions, Prograis has stated that he wants revenge against the undefeated Taylor (19-0, 13 KOs), but now, by order of the WBC, he must face American José Carlos Ramírez (27-1, 17 KOs).

Ramírez, 30 years old, is currently ranked second by the WBC. In February of 2019, in his second defense of his 140-pound belt, he defeated Zepeda by majority decision.

Twenty-five months later, Ramírez succumbed by unanimous decision to Taylor at the Virgin Hotels in Las Vegas, enabling the Scotsman to become the undisputed king of the category by winning the four most prestigious belts (WBA, WBC, WBO, IBF).

Recently, Ramírez expressed an interest in dueling with the main 140-pound contenders, including a second fight with Zepeda; although he did not rule out clashing with Prograis or Taylor. “Every fighter has the same amount of risk,” said Ramirez. “We’re a little under-promoted compared to other weight classes but I think that the best fights are at 140. You see guys fighting twice or three times, doing a trilogy. Honestly, I would love to face Regis, because I’ve never faced him. I would love to make the rematch with Zepeda, because he’s such a good fighter. Obviously I want Josh Taylor, man. I want Josh Taylor bad.”

Photo credit: Al Applerose

Article submitted by Jorge Juan Alvarez in Spanish.

Please note any adjustments made were for clarification purposes and any errors in translation were unintentional.

To comment on this story in the Fight Forum CLICK HERE

Continue Reading
Advertisement
The-Hauser-report-Broadway-Boxing-Returns-to-Broadway
Featured Articles1 week ago

The Hauser Report: Broadway Boxing Returns to Broadway

This-Week-in-Boxing-History-Jake-LaMotta-Stinks-Up-Madison-Square-Garden
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

This Week in Boxing History: Jake LaMotta Stinks Up Madison Square Garden

Chantelle-Cameron-was-Victorious-)ver-Jessica-McCaskill-But-Wants-More
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Chantelle Cameron was Victorious Over Jessica McCaskill … But Wants More

With-the-Crowd-in-Her-Corner-WBA-Champ-Seniesa-Estrada-Wins-Her-Top-Rank-Debut
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

With the Crowd in Her Corner, WBA Champ Seniesa Estrada Wins Her Top Rank Debut

Lighteweight-Contender-Jamaine-Ortiz-Keeping-Worcester-Mass-on-the-Boxing-Map
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Lightweight Contender Jamaine Ortiz: Keeping Worcester Mass on the Boxing Map

Sunny-Edwards-Proves-Too-Slick-for-Felix Alvarado-in-Sheffield
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Sunny Edwards Proves Too Slick for Felix Alvarado in Sheffield

Avila-Perspective-Chap-211-Two-Title-Fighjts-in-Las-Vegas-on-Saturday-and-More
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap. 211: Two Title Fights in Las Vegas on Saturday and More

Gervonta-Davis-vs-Ryan-Garcia-is-a-Done-Deal-for-2023
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Gervonta Davis vs Ryan Garcia is a Done Deal for 2023

R.I.P.-Former-World-Champ-Buster-Drayton
Featured Articles1 week ago

R.I.P. Former World Champ Buster Drayton

Results-from-Las-Vegas-where-Alimkhanuly-Overcame-Pesky-Denzel-Bentley
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Results from Las Vegas where Alimkhanuly Overcame Pesky Denzell Bentley

The-WBC-Wasn't-the-First-Entity-to-Overturn-the-Rseult-of-the-Fenech-Nelson-Fight
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

The WBC Wasn’t the First Entity to Overturn the Result of the Fenech-Nelson Fight

Is-the-Jake-Paul-Phenomenon-Good-for-Boxing-in-the-Long-Term?
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Is the Jake Paul Phenomenon Good for Boxing in the Long Term?

Jaime-Munguia-Wins-and-Waits-Charlo-Golovkin?
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Jaime Munguía Wins and Waits: Charlo? … Golovkin?

Thomas-Hauser's-Literary-Notes
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Thomas Hauser’s Literary Notes

Regis-Prograis-KOs-Jose-Zepeda-at-Dignity-Health-Sports-Park
Featured Articles5 days ago

Regis Prograis KOs Jose Zepeda at Dignity Sports Health Park

What-Path-will-Yokasta-Valle-Choose-Next?
Featured Articles3 days ago

What Path will Yokasta Valle Choose Next?

Ukraine's-Serhii-Bohachuk-and-Ireland's-Callum-Walsh-Win-by-KO-in-Montebello
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Ukraine’s Serhii Bohachuk and Ireland’s Callum Walsh Win by KO in Montebello

Chantelle-Cameron-All-or-Nothing-Against-Jessica-McCaskill
Featured Articles4 weeks ago

Chantelle Cameron: “All or Nothing Against Jessica McCaskill”

Natasha-Jonas-and-Terri-Harper-Two-Brirish-Women-Who-Own-the-154-Pound-Division
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Natasha Jonas and Terri Harper: Two British Women Who Own the 154-Pound Division

Yokasta-Valle-Faces-an-Epic-Challenge-Against-Evelyn-Bermudez
Featured Articles3 weeks ago

Yokasta Valle Faces an Epic Challenge Against Evelyn Bermúdez

Tyson-Returns-on-Saturday-with-a-Familiar-Foe-in-the-Opposite-Corner
Featured Articles2 days ago

Tyson Fury Returns on Saturday with a Familiar Foe in the Opposite Corner

What-Path-will-Yokasta-Valle-Choose-Next?
Featured Articles3 days ago

What Path will Yokasta Valle Choose Next?

Regis-Prograis-Knocks-Out-Jose-Zepeda-and-Clears-the-Way-for-Jose-Ramirez
Featured Articles3 days ago

Regis Prograis Knocks Out José Zepeda and Clears the Way for José Ramírez

Regis-Prograis-and-Fabio-Wardley-Excelled-on-the-last-Saturday-of-November
Featured Articles4 days ago

Regis Prograis and Fabio Wardley Excelled on the last Saturday of November

Ian-Thomsen-Recalls-His-Days-with-Buster-Douglas-Before-Buster-'Shocked-the-World'
Featured Articles5 days ago

Ian Thomsen Recalls His Days with Buster Douglas Before Buster ‘Shocked the World’

Regis-Prograis-KOs-Jose-Zepeda-at-Dignity-Health-Sports-Park
Featured Articles5 days ago

Regis Prograis KOs Jose Zepeda at Dignity Sports Health Park

John-Ryder-and-Fabio-Wardley-Triumph-on-Dueling-Shows-in-London
Featured Articles5 days ago

John Ryder and Fabio Wardley Triumph on Dueling Shows in London

Avila-Perspective-Chap-213-Regis-Prograis-vs-Jose-Zepeda-Harks-to-Pryor-Arguello
Featured Articles7 days ago

Avila Perspective, Chap 213: Regis Prograis vs Jose Zepeda Harks to Pryor-Aguello

Samuel-Carmona-Tabbed-to-Fight-Julio-Cesar-Martinez-and-Sunny-Edwards-is-Furious
Featured Articles1 week ago

Samuel Carmona Tabbed to Fight Julio Cesar Martínez and Sunny Edwards is Furious

Shakur-Stevenson-vs-Isaac-Cruz-Floats-in-a-Cloud-of-Uncertainty
Featured Articles1 week ago

Shakur Stevenson vs. Isaac Cruz Floats in a Cloud of Uncertainty

The-Hauser-report-Broadway-Boxing-Returns-to-Broadway
Featured Articles1 week ago

The Hauser Report: Broadway Boxing Returns to Broadway

R.I.P.-Former-World-Champ-Buster-Drayton
Featured Articles1 week ago

R.I.P. Former World Champ Buster Drayton

Jaime-Munguia-Wins-and-Waits-Charlo-Golovkin?
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Jaime Munguía Wins and Waits: Charlo? … Golovkin?

Juan-Francisco-Estrada-vs-Roman-Gonzalez-The-Long-Awaited-Third-Clash
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Juan Francisco Estrada vs. Román González: The Long Awaited Third Clash

Boxing-Odds-and-Ends-Notes-on-Davis-Garcia-and-Beterbiev-Yarde
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Boxing Odds and Ends: Notes on Davis-Garcia and Beterbiev-Yarde

Jaime-Munguia-KOs-Gonzalo-Coria-in-Guadalajara-Improving-to-41-0
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Jaime Munguia KOs Gonzalo Coria in Guadalajara, Improving to 41-0

Avila-Perspective-Chap-212-Tank-vs-Kingry-Munguia-and-More
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Avila Perspective, Chap: 212: Tank vs Garcia, Munguia and More

Gervonta-Davis-vs-Ryan-Garcia-is-a-Done-Deal-for-2023
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Gervonta Davis vs Ryan Garcia is a Done Deal for 2023

This-Week-in-Boxing-History-Jake-LaMotta-Stinks-Up-Madison-Square-Garden
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

This Week in Boxing History: Jake LaMotta Stinks Up Madison Square Garden

Natasha-Jonas-and-Terri-Harper-Two-Brirish-Women-Who-Own-the-154-Pound-Division
Featured Articles2 weeks ago

Natasha Jonas and Terri Harper: Two British Women Who Own the 154-Pound Division

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Advertisement